Nav: Home

ATOMS device effectively treats male incontinence with high patient satisfaction

November 21, 2016

In the largest study yet to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of the adjustable transobturator male system (ATOMS) to treat incontinence in men following invasive prostate treatment, the overall success and dry rates were 90% and 64%, respectively, after a median of 31 months.

Due to the all-time adjustability in the outpatient setting and the fixed anchoring that prevents dislocation, the ATOMS device has major advantages compared with other minimally invasive male sling options. The last generation with the small and undisturbing pre-attached full silicon-covered scrotal port system showed excellent results with short operating time (median 26 minutes) and ease of implantation.

Daily pad test and pad use decreased from a median of 400ml and 4 to a median of 18ml and 1. Concomitantly, life quality ratings significantly improved and changed to a high level of satisfaction.

"Due to this recently published data, the ATOMS continence device will play a main role in treating male stress urinary incontinence in the future," said Dr. Alexander Friedl, lead author of the BJU International study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Atoms Articles:

Stenciling with atoms in 2-dimensional materials possible
The possibilities for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene, appear almost limitless.
Microprocessors based on a layer of just 3 atoms
Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics.
Super sensitive devices work on recycling atoms
Next-generation sensors to be used in fields as diverse as mineral exploration and climate change will be turbo boosted thanks to University of Queensland and University of Sussex research.
Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms
The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops.
Sorting machine for atoms
Physicists at the University of Bonn have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms.
Boron atoms stretch out, gain new powers
Ribbons and single-atom chains of boron would have unique physical and electronic properties, according to theoretical physicists at Rice University.
ANU demonstrates 'ghost imaging' with atoms
A team of physicists at the Australian National University have used a technique known as 'ghost imaging' to create an image of an object from atoms that never interact with it.
'Weighing' atoms with electrons
The chemical properties of atoms depend on the number of protons in their nuclei, placing them into the periodic table.
New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials
Researchers have developed a novel approach to characterizing how atoms are arranged in materials, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials.
Magnetic atoms arranged in neat rows
Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg and the Vienna University of Technology have successfully created one-dimensional magnetic atom chains for the first time.

Related Atoms Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...