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ATOMS device effectively treats male incontinence with high patient satisfaction

November 21, 2016

In the largest study yet to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of the adjustable transobturator male system (ATOMS) to treat incontinence in men following invasive prostate treatment, the overall success and dry rates were 90% and 64%, respectively, after a median of 31 months.

Due to the all-time adjustability in the outpatient setting and the fixed anchoring that prevents dislocation, the ATOMS device has major advantages compared with other minimally invasive male sling options. The last generation with the small and undisturbing pre-attached full silicon-covered scrotal port system showed excellent results with short operating time (median 26 minutes) and ease of implantation.

Daily pad test and pad use decreased from a median of 400ml and 4 to a median of 18ml and 1. Concomitantly, life quality ratings significantly improved and changed to a high level of satisfaction.

"Due to this recently published data, the ATOMS continence device will play a main role in treating male stress urinary incontinence in the future," said Dr. Alexander Friedl, lead author of the BJU International study.
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Wiley

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