Nav: Home

Efforts are needed to protect native species from feral cats

November 21, 2016

Feral cats are among the most damaging invasive species worldwide, particularly in Australia where they have caused the extinction of more than 20 mammal species. New work has developed priorities for feral cat research and management, including preventing further extinctions, testing new management tools, and increasing potential for native fauna to coexist with cats.

Managing the impacts of cats will be best achieved through a combination of actions, with tools that include guardian animals and grooming traps that spray a toxin onto passing individuals. Careful planning and monitoring are needed to ensure the most cost-effective and ecologically-sound outcomes are achieved from feral cat management.

"Given the urgency of the problem, we need a layered approach, including emergency intervention for species most at risk, and research that improves longer term management of feral cat impacts in larger areas," said Dr. Tim Doherty, lead author of the Mammal Review article.
-end-


Wiley

Related Cats Articles:

First generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from domestic cats
Researchers have reported for the first time producing feline induced pluripotent stem cells (fiPSCs) from adult cells of domestic cats.
Cats are securely bonded to their people, too
Cats have a reputation for being aloof and independent. But a study of the way domestic cats respond to their caregivers suggests that their socio-cognitive abilities and the depth of their human attachments have been underestimated.
Rare antelopes and black cats
Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by a research group of W├╝rzburg University.
Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats
Diabetes patients show reduced gut bacterial diversity, and now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned that the same is true of cats.
Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research
Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan.
Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats
Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts.
Roaming cats prey on their owners' minds
Many cat owners worry about their pets wandering the streets, but perceive cats hunting mice and birds to be unavoidable instinct, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.
How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy
Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip -- also known as catmint -- produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon.
Australian mammals at greatest risk from cats and foxes, new study
New research led by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has revealed which Australian mammals are most vulnerable to cats and foxes, and many much-loved potoroos, bandicoots and bettongs, as well as native rodents, are at the top of the list.
Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats
New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age.
More Cats News and Cats Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.