Senator Jon S. Corzine pledges support to NYU Child Study Center

November 24, 2003

United States Senator Jon S. Corzine, a longtime supporter of the NYU Child Study Center, has made a generous commitment of $2 million to establish the Corzine Family Associate Professorship of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Center's Institute for Children at Risk. The endowed chair will be held by the Director of the Institute, Laurie Miller Brotman, Ph.D. Dr. Miller Brotman is the first prevention scientist in the country with an endowed chair in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry.

"We are very fortunate to have Senator Corzine as a board member, dedicated supporter of the NYU Child Study Center and a friend to our nation's children," said Harold Koplewicz, M.D., Director of the Center. "Not only has he been one of our most valued benefactors, but he also puts his heart into all his philanthropic efforts. We are so thankful for his steadfast support and continued generosity."

A founding board member of the NYU Child Study Center, Senator Corzine has been an indispensable advocate of the Center since its inception. His generosity was instrumental in the establishment of the Institute for Children at Risk in 1998. In recognition of his dedication to children's wellbeing, Senator Corzine and Joanne Corzine were honored with the Child Study Center's Child Advocacy Award in 2001.

Senator Corzine is a member of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee; the Foreign Relations Committee; and the Senate Budget Committee. Previously he served as co-chairman and co-chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs. In addition to his dedication to the Child Study Center, he has given support to numerous educational, healthcare, social service and cultural organizations. He is a member of the board of trustees of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the University of Chicago.

"I am honored to be the first Corzine Family Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry," said Dr. Miller Brotman. "With the help of Senator Corzine and the Corzine Family Foundation, the Institute for Children at Risk can continue to develop and test prevention programs for children at risk for mental health problems."

Dr. Miller Brotman is the founding and current Director of the Institute for Children at Risk at the NYU Child Study Center. Her work focuses on the development and prevention of conduct problems in young, urban children. Prevention of conduct problems has strong implications for reducing school failure and school dropout, decreasing criminal behavior and violence in young adulthood and reducing substance abuse. Dr. Miller Brotman has been the lead investigator on four federally-funded prevention trials and co-investigator on two prospective longitudinal studies of the development of conduct problems. She is currently the principal investigator on a ten-year, NIMH-funded prevention study with preschool-aged siblings of adjudicated youth as well as a U.S. Department of Education funded study of ParentCorps, a prevention program for four year olds attending public pre-kindergarten programs in low-income, urban neighborhoods.
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The NYU Child Study Center is dedicated to the understanding, prevention and treatment of child and adolescent mental health problems. The Center offers expert psychiatric services for children and families with emphasis on early diagnosis and intervention. The Center's mission is to bridge the gap between science and practice, integrating the finest research with patient care and state-of-the-art training, utilizing an extraordinary new facility and the resources of the world-class New York University School of Medicine. For more information, contact the NYU Child Study Center at 212-263-6622 or visit www.AboutOurKids.org.

New York University Child Study Center

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