Nav: Home

More reliable way to produce single photons for quantum information imprinting

November 24, 2016

Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a technique to more reliably produce single photons that can be imprinted with quantum information.

The invention will benefit a variety of processes which rely on photons to carry quantum information, such as quantum computing, secure quantum communication and precision measurements at low light levels.

Photons, particles of light, can be imprinted with information to be used for things like carrying out calculations and transmitting messages. To do this you need to create individual photons, which is a complicated and difficult process.

However researchers from the Centre for Photonics and Photonic Materials have implemented a new way to improve the performance of single-photon sources using fibre-optics and fast optical switches.

They combined several individual sources of photons using optical switches, a technique called multiplexing, using fibre optics fabricated at the University. The resulting device not only makes generating single photons more reliable but also allows control of properties of the photons created, including their colour.

Dr Robert Francis-Jones, from the Centre for Photonics and Photonic Materials, said: "Developing improved sources of single photons is one of the most pressing issues in quantum information processing. Through this research we hope to accelerate the transition of quantum-enhanced technologies from the lab to applications such as drug discovery."

The study is published in the journal Optica.
-end-
The research was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

University of Bath

Related Quantum Computing Articles:

'Valley states' in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing
New research on 2-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing.
Sound of the future: A new analog to quantum computing
In a paper published in Nature Research's journal, Communications Physics, researchers in the University of Arizona Department of Materials Science and Engineering have demonstrated the possibility for acoustic waves in a classical environment to do the work of quantum information processing without the time limitations and fragility.
Imaging of exotic quantum particles as building blocks for quantum computing
Researchers have imaged an exotic quantum particle -- called a Majorana fermion -- that can be used as a building block for future qubits and eventually the realization of quantum computers.
Virginia Tech researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing
A team of Virginia Tech chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer.
Limitation exposed in promising quantum computing material
Physicists have theorized that a new type of material, called a three-dimensional (3-D) topological insulator (TI), could be a candidate to create qubits for quantum computing due to its special properties.
More Quantum Computing News and Quantum Computing Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...