Transgenic rice for human benefit: a religious perspective

November 25, 2002

A paper to be published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by A. K. Garg and R. J. Wu, "Trehalose accumulation in rice plants confers high tolerance levels to different abiotic stresses," shows the promise of biotechnology in the service of humanity, according to a religion scholar.

Statement by Ronald Cole-Turner, Ph.D., Professor of Theology and Ethics, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 412 441 3304 x2170. coleturn@pts.edu

"The work of Ajay Garg, Ray Wu, and their colleagues is highly promising and points forward to long-awaited benefits of the biotechnology revolution.

"Their decision to patent their work but then to release it to the public domain deserves high praise. This is a bold, life-affirming decision. The benefits of their breakthrough are likely to touch the world's neediest people, those whose very existence is threatened daily by drought or poor growing conditions.

"Critics of agricultural biotechnology have often said that the results are impractical, dangerous, or only beneficial to seed companies. From now on, the critics will have to think again.

"If this work is as promising as it appears, then we will need to worry even more about population growth. We need to have the good sense--as well as strong encouragement from the world's religious communities--to limit population while we have the chance."
-end-
--Ronald Cole-Turner

Science and Religion Information Service

Related Drought Articles from Brightsurf:

Redefining drought in the US corn belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought.

The cost of drought in Italy
Drought-induced economic losses ranged in Italy between 0.55 and 1.75 billion euros over the period 2001-2016, and droughts caused significant collateral effects not only on the agricultural sector, but also on food manufacturing industries.

Consequences of the 2018 summer drought
The drought that hit central and northern Europe in summer 2018 had serious effects on crops, forests and grasslands.

Songbirds reduce reproduction to help survive drought
New research from the University of Montana suggests tropical songbirds in both the Old and New Worlds reduce reproduction during severe droughts, and this - somewhat surprisingly -- may actually increase their survival rates.

Predicting drought in the American West just got more difficult
A new, USC-led study of more than 1,000 years of North American droughts and global conditions found that forecasting a lack of precipitation is rarely straightforward.

Where is the water during a drought?
In low precipitation periods - where and how is the limited available water distributed and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape?

What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish.

With shrinking snowpack, drought predictability melting away
New research from CU Boulder suggests that during the 21st century, our ability to predict drought using snow will literally melt away.

An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems
The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI), can more sensitively capture the biological changes of ecosystems in response to the dynamics of drought intensity, compared with indices based on precipitation and temperature.

Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas

Read More: Drought News and Drought Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.