Toolkit for ocean health

November 26, 2014

The ocean is undergoing global changes at a remarkable pace and we must change with it to attain our best possible future ocean, warns the head of The University of Western Australia's Oceans Institute.

One of the global leaders in ocean science, Professor Carlos Duarte has shared his insights on the future of the world's oceans in a paper published in the international open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

In the paper Professor Duarte explains the grand challenge researchers face in addressing global change and the future state of the ocean.

"The ocean is under significant impact by anthropogenic global pressures such as ocean acidification, warming, overfishing and pollution, resulting from the impact of human activity on major processes that regulate the functions of the planet," he said.

"Dependence on resources including water, energy and key elements has prompted a suite of changes at the global scale and we are now facing the impacts of climate change, a loss of biodiversity and deteriorating water quality.

"While human pressures such as overfishing have occurred for almost 200,000 years, the cumulative impact of these combined pressures in recent years is now significantly influencing ocean health through unprecedented pressures.

"Consequently, planning of infrastructure, resource management, industry operations and conservation policies all require the capacity to anticipate change and forecast the likely properties of the future ocean."

Professor Duarte explained that a number of conclusions can be forecast by analysing current ocean trends.

"By the end of the twenty-first Century the oceans will be warmer, with a reduced ice extent, higher sea levels, more acidic and with somewhat lower oxygen levels than at present," he said.

"Research effort must be directed to understanding the responses of marine systems to these multiple, cumulative pressures."

Professor Duarte advises that policy makers, the public and the scientific community should accept change as a prerequisite to manage it. He emphasises the need for partnerships to frame research findings in effective ways and foster widespread action.

"Close cooperation between these groups is needed to progress our capacity to manage ocean problems adaptively," Professor Duarte said.

"The future ocean will be, no doubt, different in many ways from the ocean we enjoy today, but we can still direct that change. In order to get back behind the steering wheel the goals of policy makers, the public and scientists must converge to guide this change in order to achieve our best possible future ocean."

Professor Duarte was recently appointed Editor-in-Chief of the newly launched journal and will maintain a position with the UWA as an Adjunct Professor following his departure from the UWA Oceans Institute.

The UWA Oceans Institute strives to deliver ocean-based solutions for humanity's grand challenges.
-end-
1. Media reference

Winthrop Professor Carlos Duarte
Director, UWA Oceans Institute; School of Plant Biology
Tel. +61 427133066

David Stacey
UWA Media Manager
Tel. +61 864883229 / +61 432637716
E-mail: david.stacey@uwa.edu.au

2. For online articles, please include a link to the article, which will appear on the following active URL: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fmars.2014.00063/full

Article title: Global Change and the Future Ocean: A Grand Challenge for Marine Sciences
Journal: Frontiers in Marine Science
DOI: doi: 10.3389/fmars.2014.00063
Author: Carlos M. Duarte

3. About UWA's Ocean Institute

The UWA Oceans Institute brings together the strength if UWA's researchers into a multidisciplinary, integrated research focus. The goal is to capitalise on UWA's existing research strengths- in areas such as oceanography, ecology, engineering, resource management and governance-and utilise them to deliver ocean solutions for humanity's grand challenges.

4. About Frontiers

Frontiers is a community-driven open-access publisher and research networking platform. Established by scientists in 2007, Frontiers drives innovations in peer-review, article level metrics, post publication review, democratic evaluation, research networking and a growing ecosystem of open-science tools. The "Frontiers in" journal series has published 25,000 peer-reviewed articles across 49 journals, which receive 6 million monthly views, and are supported by over 160,000 leading researchers worldwide. In 2014, Frontiers won the ALPSP Innovation in Publishing Award. For more information, visit: http://www.frontiersin.org

Frontiers

Related Climate Change Articles from Brightsurf:

Are climate scientists being too cautious when linking extreme weather to climate change?
Climate science has focused on avoiding false alarms when linking extreme events to climate change.

Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past.

Mapping the path of climate change
Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states.

Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world
A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming -- how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

Sub-national 'climate clubs' could offer key to combating climate change
'Climate clubs' offering membership for sub-national states, in addition to just countries, could speed up progress towards a globally harmonized climate change policy, which in turn offers a way to achieve stronger climate policies in all countries.

Review of Chinese atmospheric science research over the past 70 years: Climate and climate change
Over the past 70 years since the foundation of the People's Republic of China, Chinese scientists have made great contributions to various fields in the research of atmospheric sciences, which attracted worldwide attention.

A CERN for climate change
In a Perspective article appearing in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tim Palmer (Oxford University), and Bjorn Stevens (Max Planck Society), critically reflect on the present state of Earth system modelling.

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change
Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

Believing in climate change doesn't mean you are preparing for climate change, study finds
Notre Dame researchers found that although coastal homeowners may perceive a worsening of climate change-related hazards, these attitudes are largely unrelated to a homeowner's expectations of actual home damage.

Older forests resist change -- climate change, that is
Older forests in eastern North America are less vulnerable to climate change than younger forests, particularly for carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity, new research finds.

Read More: Climate Change News and Climate Change Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.