New technique to make objects invisible proposed

November 26, 2018

In recent years, invisibility has become an area of increasing research interest due to advances in materials engineering. This research work by the UEx, which has been published in Scientific Reports by the Nature Group, has explored the electromagnetic properties of specific materials which can make certain objects invisible when they are introduced into its interior, in the manner of fillers. Normally, artificial materials known as metamaterials, or materials with high dielectric or magnetic constants, are used

This idea for attaining invisibility using filler materials instead of external layers, was inspired by the Final-Year Project of Alberto Serna and Luis Molina, undergraduate students of Telecommunications at the UEx. "Although all of us think of the invisibility cloak of Harry Potter and this is the model that other scientists have used to invisibilize objects, up to now, the idea of fillers, previously suggested in the novel The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells, in which Griffin becomes invisible by injecting himself with a lightening agent", explains the researcher Alberto Serna, who is currently working on his doctoral thesis in the Telecommunications Group at the UEx .

Serna clarifies that "the majority of the techniques with which cloaks of invisibility are developed harness the extraordinary properties of certain materials to make light circumvent the object to be made invisible". Nevertheless, this model cannot be implemented using fillers, because the object is exposed to the light and therefore forced to interact with it. "We have used a different technique, plasmonic cloaking, which makes the object and the filler jointly invisible", says Serna from Italy, where he is currently on a research stay.

In this way, the method makes it possible to achieve invisibility from the interior of an object without using any external device. In addition, invisibility using fillers allows the object to interact with its environment without being hampered by the external cloaking. The technique is valid for objects of small size, and the bandwidths achieved are still narrow, but the investigators believe the scope for further improvements is promising.

New applications

Luis Landesa, who led this work, contends that the idea of fillers opens up a new array of applications "because the fact that an object can "see" the outside without hindrance from external layers is novel and promising". The researchers suggest applications which range from using non-solid materials to uses in communications and bioengineering. A typical example of the utility of invisibility is in invisible microscopic probes which do not perturb the device to be measured; with the use of fillers, in addition, the reading itself would not be altered, this being the problem posed by invisibility cloaks.
-end-


University of Extremadura

Related Invisibility Articles from Brightsurf:

New invisibility concept and miniaturization of photonic circuits using ultrafast laser
Thanks to its unique three-dimensional manufacturing capacity, ultrafast laser writing is a prime candidate to meet the growing demand for the miniaturization of photonic circuitry, e.g., for scaling up optical quantum computers capacity.

The invisibility cloak of a fungus
The human immune system can easily recognize fungi because their cells are surrounded by a solid cell wall of chitin and other complex sugars.

Cretan tomb's location may have strengthened territorial claim
Examining the position occupied by tombs in their landscape in Prepalatial Crete gives us new insights into the role played by burial sites, mortuary practices and the deceased in the living society.

Artificial intelligence (AI) designs metamaterials used in the invisibility cloak
The research group of Prof. Junsuk Rho, Sunae So and Jungho Mun of Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering at POSTECH developed a design with a higher degree of freedom which allows to choose materials and to design photonic structures arbitrarily by using Deep Learning.

Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves
Some have dreamt of the perfect cloak to make buildings impervious to stress waves caused by bombs, earthquakes or other calamities.

Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders
A pair of researchers at Tokyo Tech describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating.

New technique to make objects invisible proposed
Researchers at the University of Extremadura have demonstrated the electromagnetic invisibility of objects using an alternative technique, based on filler cloaking.

Extremely small magnetic nanostructures with invisibility cloak imaged
In novel concepts of magnetic data storage, it is intended to send small magnetic bits back and forth in a chip structure, store them densely packed and read them out later.

Missing men, missing infertility: New research flags up problem
Men are missing from fertility debates and crucial support services because they are often not included in studies and, when they are, it is usually only married, heterosexual men who are asked for data.

Scientists discover the secrets behind the cuttlefish's 3-D 'invisibility cloak'
An international team of scientists has identified the neural circuits that enable cuttlefish to change their appearance in just the blink to eye -- and discovered that this is similar to the neural circuit that controls iridescence in squids.

Read More: Invisibility News and Invisibility Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.