Research from ASCO'S Quality Care Symposium shows advances and challenges in improving the quality of cancer care

November 27, 2012

ALEXANDRIA, Va. - New studies released today reveal important advances in cancer care quality measurement, physician adherence to quality standards, and end-of-life care, while highlighting the overuse of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. The studies were released in a presscast today in advance of ASCO's inaugural 2012 Quality Care Symposium. The Symposium will take place November 30 - December 1, 2012, at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego.

Four major studies were highlighted in today's presscast:"Ensuring that our patients receive the highest quality care possible is a core responsibility of oncology. The studies presented today show us new strategies for measuring and improving our adherence to quality standards," said Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee member. "The findings also provide insight on discussing treatment options for patients with both early-stage and advanced cancers."

This year's Quality Care Symposium will include more than 330 abstracts covering topics, such as reducing overuse of tests and procedures, improving patient-physician communication, effectively measuring quality of care, and applying advanced health information technology to improve the quality and value of care.
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Information for Media: www.asco.org/QCSpresskit

Additional Resources for Patients and Reporters:To view the full release click here: http://www.asco.org/ASCOv2/Department%20Content/Communications/Downloads/QCS%20Research%20Release.pdf

ATTRIBUTION TO THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY QUALITY CARE SYMPOSIUM IS REQUESTED IN ALL NEWS COVERAGE.

Funding for this conference was made possible in part by a grant (1 R13 HS021377-01) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

About ASCO

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is the world's leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people with cancer. With more than 30,000 members, ASCO is committed to improving cancer care through scientific meetings, educational programs and peer-reviewed journals. ASCO is supported by its affiliate organization, the Conquer Cancer Foundation, which funds ground-breaking research and programs that make a tangible difference in the lives of people with cancer. For ASCO information and resources, visit www.asco.org. Patient-oriented cancer information is available at www.Cancer.Net.

American Society of Clinical Oncology

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