Pioneering electrical engineering work recognized

November 27, 2012

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) -- Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering in the Bourns College of Engineering and founding chair of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Riverside has been named an IEEE Fellow for 2013. IEEE is the world's leading professional organization for advancing technology for humanity.

Balandin, who is also the recipient of IEEE Pioneer of Nanotechnology Award for 2011, is being recognized for his contributions to the characterization of thermo-electric properties of semiconductor nanostructures and graphene, a material that could play a major role in keeping laptops and other electronic devices from overheating.

His pioneering studies of the thermal conductivity of graphene led to the creation of a new active graphene thermal field of research with applications in thermal management of advanced electronic and optoelectronic devices. His study of confined acoustic phonons led to better understanding of thermal and electrical properties of semiconductor nanostructures.

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth of one- percent of the total voting membership. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement. For 2013, 298 individuals have been elevated to IEEE Fellow.
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With 400,000 members in 160 countries, the IEEE is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics. Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world's literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 900 active industry standards.

University of California - Riverside

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