Studies from 2012 Quality Care Symposium highlight findings in improving quality of cancer care

November 28, 2012

ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Five additional studies to be presented at the 2012 Quality Care Symposium provide insight on how oncology practices can improve the quality of care they provide. The Symposium will take place November 30 - December 1, at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego.

Note to Media: Statements from ASCO Communications Committee Member, Jyoti Patel, MD, can be cited throughout can be used in part or in their entirety.

Abstract #69

Rates of diagnostic imaging in long-term survivors of young adult malignancies

Corinne Daly, BSc, MSc
Institute of Medical Science
University of Toronto
Toronto

Oral Abstract Session A

Friday, November 30, 2012, 10:50-11:00 AM PST
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Douglas Pavilion B

"For the past several years, clinical practice guidelines have recommended decreasing the amount of surveillance in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. Unfortunately, we are still seeing overuse of diagnostic imaging, which is associated with increased anxiety about test results and unnecessary radiation exposure. To mitigate this problem, we are educating internists ,general physicians, and patients about overuse of scans."

- Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee

Abstract #73

Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as determined by radiation oncologists in cooperation with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA)

Harvey J. Mamon, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston

Oral Abstract Session B

Saturday, December 1, 2012, 11:45-11:55 AM PST
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Douglas Pavilion B

"Many hospitals may be using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) unnecessarily. To maximize resources for both the physician and patient, we want to make sure that IMRT is used only when needed. This study provides a model that will help radiation oncologists decide when the use of IMRT is warranted."

- Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee

Abstract #285

Data-driven transformation to an oncology patient-centered medical home

John David Sprandio, MD
Consultants in Medical Oncology and Hematology
Delaware County Memorial Hospital
Drexel Hill, Penn.

General Session II: Models That Work: Integration across the Spectrum (Part I)

Friday, November 30, 2012, 2:10-2:30 PM PST
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Douglas Pavilion B

"There is an effort to get electronic medical records (EMRs) into every medical practice, but implementation of EMRs alone does not improve care. Having a patient-centered medical home, such as the one described in this study, would improve the quality of the EMR system as well as its use because it integrates data from specialists and tracks patient care against national guidelines."

- Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee

Abstract #287

Improving cancer care by linking community cancer center physicians to disease site-specific experts

Patricia H. Hardenbergh, MD
Shaw Regional Cancer Center
Vail Valley Medical Center
Edwards, Colo.

Oral Abstract Session B

Saturday, December 1, 2012, 12:05-12:15 PM PST
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Douglas Pavilion B

"The online technology described in this study enables community radiation oncologists to discuss cases and review radiation oncology treatment plans with a panel of experts. Those discussions are leading to changes in treatment decisions. In remote and underserved areas, being able to do a telemedicine consult instead of requiring a patient to travel to the practice for an assessment might be very helpful."

- Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee

This study is funded by the Conquer Cancer Foundation of ASCO Improving Cancer Care Grant, funded by Susan G. Komen for the Cure®.

Abstract #298

Short-term outcomes of implementation of computer-based breast cancer risk assessment program during screening mammography

Debra M. Ray, MD
Leon Hess Cancer Center and Jacqueline M. Wilentz Comprehensive Breast Center at Monmouth Medical Center
Long Branch, N.J.

General Poster Session B

Saturday, December 1, 2012, 12:30-2:00 PM PST
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Douglas Pavilion C

"High risk breast cancer screening is very time-consuming and expensive, so we want to make sure that we are targeting the appropriate patients. This study offers a computer-based model for identifying women who are at high risk of developing breast cancer at the point of care - at the time of screening mammography. "

- Jyoti Patel, MD, ASCO Cancer Communications Committee
-end-
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Information for Media: www.asco.org/QCSpresskit

ATTRIBUTION TO THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY QUALITY CARE SYMPOSIUM IS REQUESTED IN ALL NEWS COVERAGE.

Funding for this conference was made possible in part by a grant (1 R13 HS021377-01) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

About ASCO

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is the world's leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people with cancer. With more than 30,000 members, ASCO is committed to improving cancer care through scientific meetings, educational programs and peer-reviewed journals. ASCO is supported by its affiliate organization, the Conquer Cancer Foundation, which funds ground-breaking research and programs that make a tangible difference in the lives of people with cancer. For ASCO information and resources, visit www.asco.org. Patient-oriented cancer information is available at www.Cancer.Net.

American Society of Clinical Oncology

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