William Small, Jr., M.D., named Loyola Senior Scientist of the Year

November 28, 2016

MAYWOOD, IL - William Small, Jr., MD, FACRO, FACR, FASTRO, chair of the department of radiation oncology, has been named Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine's Senior Scientist of the Year.

The award is based on scholarly productivity, service to the institution and community, professional society activities, research funding, mentoring and peer-review activities for both scientific journals and external sponsors of research funding.

Dr. Small received the award November 3 during the 37th annual St. Albert's Day, which celebrates Loyola's commitment to research. Lara Dugas, PhD, MPH, assistant professor, department of public health sciences, was named Junior Scientist of the Year.

Dr. Small is a fellow of the American College of Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology. He is former president of the Council of Affiliated Regional Radiation Oncology Societies and the Chicago Radiological Society. He is immediate past chair of the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup.

Dr. Small has been lead researcher in multiple national and international clinical trials. He has written more than 190 publications, 25 invited book chapters and six books, including textbooks on toxicity and combining targeted biological agents with radiation.

Dr. Small has published in many leading journals and is a member of multiple editorial boards, including Advances in Radiation Oncology and Brachytherapy. Dr. Small also has helped bring state-of-the-art cancer clinical trials to low- and middle-income countries.
-end-


Loyola University Health System

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