Nav: Home

NASA's Aqua satellite sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Tokage

November 28, 2016

Tropical Cyclone Tokage fell apart after crossing the Philippines and moving into the South China Sea where wind shear battered the storm. NASA's Aqua satellite took a visible picture of the storm as it was being torn apart on Nov. 28.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tokage's remnants in the South China Sea on Nov. 28 at 1240 a.m. EST (540 UTC). The image showed that the bulk of clouds associated with the remnants were pushed north of the center of circulation.

On Nov. 28 at 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued their final warning on Tokage. At that time Tokage had maximum sustained winds near 28.7 mph (25 knots/46.3 kph) and they were weakening. The storm was located near 16.3 degrees north latitude and 116.7 degrees east longitude, about 242 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila, Philippines. It was moving to the southwest at 19.5 mph (17 knots/31.4 kph).

JTWC noted that "animated multispectral satellite imagery reveals that the remnants of Tokage has embedded within the northeasterly cold surge which has caused it to accelerate southwestward and almost completely unravel."

The remnants are expected to continue to move to the southwest and completely dissipate.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related South China Sea Articles:

NASA-NOAA satellite snaps image of tropical storm Higos in South China Sea
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Higos.
NASA sees compact Tropical Storm Jangmi exiting East China Sea
Tropical Storm Jangmi was exiting the East China Sea and moving toward the Sea of Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite measured the strength of the system.
China 2050: How the US should prepare for an ascendant China -- RAND Report
New RAND report says US should prepare for a triumphant or ascending People's Republic of China -- scenarios that not only align with current PRC national development trends but also represent the most challenging future scenarios for the US military.
NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone Nuri in South China Sea
A low-pressure system that developed in the Philippine Sea and tracked over the central Philippines has moved into the South China Sea and become a depression.
Sea otters, opossums and the surprising ways pathogens move from land to sea
A parasite known only to be hosted in North America by the Virginia opossum is infecting sea otters along the West Coast.
UCF study: Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial
The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100.
Deep-sea coral gardens discovered in the submarine canyons off south Western Australia
Stunning 'gardens' of deep-sea corals have been discovered in the Bremer Canyon Marine Park by Australian and international scientists during an oceanographic expedition aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor.
From China to the South Pole: Joining forces to solve the neutrino mass puzzle
Study by Mainz physicists indicates that the next generation of neutrino experiments may well find the answer to one of the most pressing issues in neutrino physics.
Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea
New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea.
NASA satellite tracks tropical storm Phanfone into the South China Sea
Tropical Storm Phanfone brought typhoon-force winds and heavy rains across sections of the Philippines on Christmas Eve and Christmas day.
More South China Sea News and South China Sea Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.