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Program helps teens 'get the message' about distracted driving

November 28, 2016

November 28, 2016 - A program to educate teens about distracted driving--including a tour of a hospital trauma center and testimony from a trauma survivor--can increase awareness of the dangers of texting, cell phone use, and other distractions while driving, reports a study in the Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses.

After going through the "Get the Message" program, teens say they will be less likely to text or make cell phone calls while driving, according to the study by Ruth Adeola, RN, MS, and colleagues of R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore. They write, "Although teens are the least likely of any age group to engage in healthy driving behaviors, this study demonstrates the ability to influence teen knowledge and behavior positively."

Program Increases 'Perceived Threat' of Distracted Driving

The study evaluated the effectiveness of the "Get the Message" program, designed to identify, define, and measure the factors contributing to distracted driving in adolescents. About 900 teens were surveyed before and after completing the hospital-based injury prevention program.

The program consisted of four sections, including:
  • An introduction regarding the various types of distracted driving (visual, manual, and cognitive)--focusing on the unique risks faced by inexperienced teen drivers.

  • A trauma center tour depicting the "journey" of an injured patient--from the hospital helipad, to the trauma resuscitation unit, to the intensive care units.

  • A video depicting the physical, emotional, and mental trauma resulting from a motor vehicle crash due to distracted driving.

  • A presentation by a survivor of a serious crash sustained as a teenager--emphasizing a sense of "connection and commonality" with the survivor, and the way the crash affected that person's life.

Before-and-after questionnaires from 900 teens indicated that the program increased awareness of the risks of distracted driving. For example, after the program, the teens were more likely to understand that texting while driving was as dangerous as driving while impaired. They were also more likely to understand the risks of other types of distractions, such as driving while talking on the phone.

Participants also said they were more likely to follow healthy driving behaviors in the future. The percentage of teens who said they were unlikely to make a phone call while driving increased from 64 percent before viewing the video to 82 percent afterward. The percentage who said they were unlikely to send a text while driving increased from 69 to 92 percent.

Several factors contribute to the unique risk of distracted driving teenage drivers, including limited driving experience, lower awareness of their driving abilities and weaknesses, and an "illusion of invincibility" that may cause them to underestimate the dangers of risky activities. Incorporating developmental theories relevant to health beliefs and social learning, the "Get the Message" program aimed to provide information and up-close knowledge of the risks and real-life impact of distracted driving.

"Based on the results of the post-survey, it is safe to say that the distracted driving program influenced teen-driving behaviors positively," Ruth Adeola and coauthors conclude. They believe that the program succeeded by "increasing perceived threat and providing a social context in which teens could interact and learn."
-end-
Click here to read "Get the Message: A Teen Distracted Driving Program."

Article: "Get the Message: A Teen Distracted Driving Program" (doi: 10.1097/JTN.0000000000000240)

About Journal of Trauma Nursing

As the official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses, the Journal of Trauma Nursing supports the STN's strategic goals of effective communication, education and patient advocacy with original, peer-reviewed, research and evidence-based articles and information that reflect the highest standard of collaborative care for trauma patients. The Journal of Trauma Nursing, through a commitment to editorial excellence, implements STN's vision to improve practice and patient outcomes and to become the premiere global nursing organization across the trauma continuum.

About The Society of Trauma Nurses

The Society of Trauma Nurses is a professional nonprofit organization whose mission is to ensure optimal trauma care to all people locally, regionally, nationally and globally through initiatives focused on trauma nurses related to prevention, education and collaboration with other healthcare disciplines. The Society of Trauma Nurses advocates for the highest level of quality trauma care across the continuum. We accomplish this through an environment that fosters visionary leadership, mentoring, innovation and interdisciplinary collaboration in the delivery of trauma care.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2015 annual revenues of €4.2 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. For more information about our products and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.

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