64th American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting

November 29, 2010

The American Epilepsy Society (AES) 64th Annual Meeting, the preeminent scientific and educational conference for professionals concerned with seizures and epilepsy, will take place December 3 - 7, 2010, at the Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center, San Antonio.

A series of nine media briefings is scheduled from Saturday, December 4 through Tuesday morning, December 7.

Place: Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center, San Antonio, TX
Briefing Time: See list that follows.
Press room / Briefing room: Room 101B, Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center

Main Briefing: First Major National Study of Epilepsy in Decades
Monday, December 6, 12:15 am -1:00 pm (CT)

Briefing call-in number: 1-866-740-1260; Passcode 5867508#

First Major National Study of Epilepsy in Decades

Not since the early 1970's has there been a comprehensive national study of the public health dimensions of epilepsy. A national study of the health burden of epilepsy under joint government and non-governmental organization sponsorship will be announced. The study is expected to increase awareness of this common neurological disorder and elevate its position on the national health agenda.

Other Briefings

Saturday, December 4th - 10:00am(CT)

Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans and Children
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the signature wound in today's veterans and the most frequent cause of death and disability in children. Presentations will cover the discovery of a biomarker for susceptibility to developing post-traumatic epilepsy, the incidence of status epilepticus among pediatric patients with TBI, and the care of veterans in the new VA Epilepsy Centers of Excellence.

Saturday, December 4th - 4:00pm (CT)

Status Epilepticus: Potentially Life-Threatening Non-Stop Seizures
Estimates of up to 200,000 cases of status epilepticus (SE) occur annually, often occurring as a first seizure in people with epilepsy. Researchers will report on status epilepticus in a veteran population, and on the prevalence on non-convulsive seizures, including SE, due to cerebral hemorrhage and hematoma in the ICU.

Sunday, December 5th - 9:00am (CT)

New Insight into the Effect of Diet on Seizure Control
What people with epilepsy eat may have more of an effect on seizure control than is commonly thought. One study reveals when and for what type of seizures the ketogenic and modified Atkins diets might best be used. Another finds a basic mechanism for the effect of diet on seizure control.

Sunday, December 5th - 2:00pm (CT)

Breaking News in Neurostimulation for Epilepsy
Neurostimulation therapy is at the forefront in research to conquer drug-resistant seizures. The three-year efficacy results of DBS therapy in the SANTE trial are reported, as well as results of the pilot study of a novel developing external device for quelling seizures.

Monday, December 6th - 9:00am (CT)

Disparities in Healthcare for People with Epilepsy
Featured reports in this briefing analyze differences in emergency department visits, hospital admissions, length of hospital stay, and other disparities in treatment associated with health resource utilization by race/ethnicity, Medicaid status, and geographic area.

Monday, December 6th - 3:00pm (CT)

Elephant in the Living Room: Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP)
Families who suffer the loss of a loved one to SUDEP are often unaware of this tragic possibility. A parent will relate her experience in losing a child, and researchers will discuss new data on SUDEP risks, the incidence of SUDEP in a population study, and a study of SUDEP with a particular medication.

Tuesday, December 7th - 8:30am (CT)

On the Cutting-Edge toward Prevention and Cure
Research is moving beyond the control of symptoms (seizures) to either preventing epilepsy from developing (neuroprotection), or reversing the condition (neurogenesis) if it should develop. Animal studies showing promise in both of these approaches will be discussed.

In-person and telephone interviews with any of the conference presenters can be scheduled by mutual convenience. To arrange an interview, contact:

Peter Van Haverbeke, 703-927-9639, pvanhaverbeke@gmail.com
Natalie Judd, 203-389-5223, Natalie@bigvoicecomm.com
-end-
The AES meeting attracts more than 4,000 physicians, scientists, and allied healthcare professionals from around the globe, and features 1,100 scientific abstracts, a two-day investigators workshop, 10 clinical symposia, 38 clininical/scientific interest group sessions, and other professional program highlights. Epilepsy is the most serious brain disorder affecting 50 million people worldwide.

American Epilepsy Society

Related Epilepsy Articles from Brightsurf:

Focal epilepsy often overlooked
Having subtler symptoms, a form of epilepsy that affects only one part of the brain often goes undiagnosed long enough to cause unexpected seizures that contribute to car crashes, a new study finds.

Antibodies in the brain trigger epilepsy
Certain forms of epilepsy are accompanied by inflammation of important brain regions.

Breaching the brain's defense causes epilepsy
Epileptic seizures can happen to anyone. But how do they occur and what initiates such a rapid response?

Using connectomics to understand epilepsy
Abnormalities in structural brain networks and how brain regions communicate may underlie a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, which is one focus of a two-part Special Issue on the Brain Connectome in Brain Connectivity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain
When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm.

How concussions may lead to epilepsy
Researchers have identified a cellular response to repeated concussions that may contribute to seizures in mice like those observed following traumatic brain injury in humans.

Understanding epilepsy in pediatric tumors
A KAIST research team led by Professor Jeong Ho Lee of the Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering has recently identified a neuronal BRAF somatic mutation that causes intrinsic epileptogenicity in pediatric brain tumors.

Can medical marijuana help treat intractable epilepsy?
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the potential of medicinal cannabis -- or medical marijuana -- for helping patients with intractable epilepsy, in which seizures fail to come under control with standard anticonvulsant treatment.

Fertility rates no different for women with epilepsy
'Myth-busting' study among women with no history of infertility finds that those with epilepsy are just as likely to become pregnant as those without.

Do women with epilepsy have similar likelihood of pregnancy?
Women with epilepsy without a history of infertility or related disorders who wanted to become pregnant were about as likely as their peers without epilepsy to become pregnant.

Read More: Epilepsy News and Epilepsy Current Events
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