Elsevier congratulates Prof. Marvin Bauer, Editor-in-Chief of Remote Sensing of Environment

November 29, 2010

Amsterdam, 29 November 2010 - Elsevier is pleased to congratulate Prof. Marvin Bauer for receiving the 2010 William T. Pecora Award, in recognition of his many contributions to remote sensing education, science and applications and sustained accomplishments. The award was presented by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Earlier this month, the award was presented by Dr. Brad Doorn of NASA's Science Mission Directorate and Dr. Thomas Loveland of the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation and Science Center. The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to recognize outstanding contributions by individuals or groups toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing.

As a research agronomist for the Purdue University Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing, Prof. Bauer helped define the role of remote sensing for agriculture and forestry and made significant contributions to NASA's Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. At the University of Minnesota he also investigated forestry applications. His recent work has concentrated on monitoring lake water quality, impervious surface mapping, land cover classification, and change detection. Prof. Bauer has mentored many students during his career.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said in the award's citation, "Dr. Bauer is perhaps best known for 30 years of outstanding service as the editor-in-chief for the premier remote sensing journal - Remote Sensing of Environment. Through his untiring efforts, it has become the top-rated remote sensing journal according to the Science Citation Index Impact Factor. Dr. Bauer has directly improved the credibility of remote sensing science through his commitment to the timely publication of the highest quality papers".
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Remote Sensing of Environment serves the remote sensing community with the publication of results on theory, science, applications and technology of remote sensing of earth resources and environment. Thoroughly interdisciplinary, the journal publishes on terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric sensing. Remote Sensing of Environment ranks #1 with the highest Impact Factor in the category "Remote Sensing" of the ISI Journal Citation Reports.

About Remote Sensing of Environment

Remote Sensing of Environment serves the remote sensing community with the publication of results on theory, science, applications and technology of remote sensing of Earth resources and environment. Thoroughly interdisciplinary, this journal publishes on terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric sensing. The emphasis of the journal is on biophysical and quantitative approaches to remote sensing at local to global scales. Areas of interest include, but are not necessarily restricted to:About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include SciVerse ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Reaxys, MD Consult and Nursing Consult, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai's Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

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