NJIT professor Alexander Haimovich named to endowed chair in electrical engineering

November 29, 2011

NJIT Professor Alexander Haimovich has been named the new Ying Wu Endowed Chair in Wireless Telecommunications in the NJIT Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Newark College of Engineering.

Haimovich recently served as the director of the New Jersey Center for Wireless Telecommunications, a state-funded consortium. Members include NJIT, Princeton University, Rutgers University and Stevens Institute of Technology. Haimovich has been at NJIT since 1992. Prior to then, he served in a variety of capacities in the industry including Chief Scientist of a consulting firm and senior staff consultant for AEL Industries.

In 2003, Haimovich served as chair of the Communication Theory Symposium at Globecom. He was for many years an associate editor for IEEE Communications Letters and more recently a guest editor for the EURASIP Journal of Applied Signal Processing Special Issue on Turbo Coding.

Haimovich received his doctorate in systems from the University of Pennsylvania, his master's degree in electrical engineering from Drexel University and his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the Technion, Haifa, Israel.

His research interests focus on advanced radar, sensing, and communication systems including multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar, geolocation, compressed-sensing for target localization, and signal design. Over the years, Haimovich's research has been supported by the US Air Force, National Science Foundation, Army, and industry.

The Ying Wu Endowed Chair is supported by a gift of $1.5 million from Ying Wu, founder of a highly-successful telecommunications firm, who earned a master's degree in electrical engineering from Newark College of Engineering at NJIT in 1988.
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NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, enrolls more than 9,558 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2010 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Office of Continuing Professional Education.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

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