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Relation of key determinants affecting mental health disorders in greater mekong subregion

November 29, 2017

ASEAN integration is likely to bring about a substantial change to this area in the new era; it can subsequently cause many problems as well. The characteristic differences among the GMS member countries in terms of trade and investment, social and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and work environment have become major problems associated with mental health disorders, which are usually identified as depression, stress, and substance abuse.

This literature review aims to identify and review the relationships among the key determinants affecting the mental health disorders of the GMS people. The study showed that the increasing number of mental health disorders has become a big burden for national healthcare expenditure. Therefore, the strong relationship among mental health, mental disorders, economic status, and financial issues has been addressed in many studies. Financial issues have become a major key to the wide prevalence of mental disorders in the GMS. In addition, health issues related to mental health disorders are also caused by the environment and other related factors and therefore a stable and a well-balanced environment is an indicator of healthy mental status. Moreover, the factors contributing to mental health disorders are significantly correlated with social inequalities, whereby high social inequalities bring about extreme mental risk. The economic, healthcare, social and environment problems in the GMS area should be solved through policy development, follow-up planning, strategic implementation, and collaboration among all related sectors, especially in terms of the economy, the environment, and healthcare.

Consequently, there are four key determinants that affect people's lives, especially in terms of mental health, thus leading to mental health disorders: 1) economic; 2) healthcare; 3) environmental; and 4) social. Globalization and urbanization should follow sustainable development suggestion and concerns about the population's health, especially regarding mental health.
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This article is open access and can be downloaded from here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/154346

Reference: Nget M, et al. A Review of the Relationships among the Key Determinants Affecting the Mental Health Disorders of the People in Greater Mekong Subregion Countries. Current Psychiatry Reviews, 2017, Vol 13, DOI: 10.2174/1573400513666170720143417

Authors:

Manndy Nget1* and Kasorn Muijeen2

1 Ph.D. student, Faculty of Nursing, Thammasat University, Thailand Center for Nursing Research and Innovation, Faculty of Nursing, Thammasat University, Thailand

2 Department of Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Thammasat University, Thailand

*Address correspondence to the author at the Faculty of Nursing Thammasat University, P.O. Box: 99 Khlong 1, Khlong Luang, Pathumthani, Thailand; Tel/Fax:+66-8986-9213 Ext. 7353 Email: manndy.mn@gmail.com (MN) and Email: fon_kasorn@hotmail.com

Bentham Science Publishers

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