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First-ever UN University diploma offered to grads of online water-management course

November 30, 2003

In an effort to help raise the quality of water management expertise worldwide, the United Nations University has authorized for the first time in its 26-year history a diploma to be granted to global graduates of a unique new online training program called the "UN Water Virtual Learning Center."

Practicing water professionals who complete the 10-course, 250-hour program on Integrated Water Resources Management will earn an unprecedented diploma bearing the United Nations / UNU insignia. The program will be offered through affiliated institutions in Africa, Asia and the South Pacific, eventually expanding worldwide.

The heart of this capacity-building program: the fundamentals of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM), involving such diverse water topics as: science, management, regulatory processes, quantity and quality assessment, treatment, institutional governance and socio-economics.

The curriculum is designed as an undergraduate course for adult professionals, usually with undergraduate degrees but with little or no training in IWRM. It will be of greatest immediate benefit to engineers, district managers, government administrators and others responsible for water management at the national and regional level who wish to upgrade their knowledge of modern water management concepts and principles. Other individuals may take the course as part of a self-directed learning experience.



United Nations University

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