New edition of the Joslin Guide to Diabetes, a must read for people with diabetes

November 30, 2005

BOSTON - If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with diabetes, you probably have many questions. Why did I get diabetes? What should I eat? How do I manage my blood glucose levels? How will it affect my future health? And more.

The Joslin Guide to Diabetes: A Program For Managing Your Treatment is an indispensable resource for people with diabetes and their families. The new, completely updated version, published by Simon and Schuster, is available now for $16.95 plus shipping and handling through Joslin's Online Store (https://store.joslin.org/) or by calling 1-800-344-4501.

Building on groundbreaking research and more than a century of experience educating and caring for patients, Joslin Diabetes Center empowers patients to control their diabetes to prevent or minimize serious complications like heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. The Guide was written by Richard S. Beaser, M.D., and Amy P. Campbell, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., both practicing clinicians at Joslin, and was reviewed by the Joslin clinical staff to ensure consistency with Joslin's world-renowned clinical practice and treatment guidelines.

"The Joslin Guide is our flagship for patient education. Everyone who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes should have this book," says Dr. Beaser. "It's truly comprehensive and user-friendly. Many patients view the Guide as an essential tool for managing their diabetes care."

Important Need-to-Know Advice

The Joslin Guide reflects extensive new research findings and treatments that have emerged in the last decade. Easy-to-read with lots of charts and illustrations, The Joslin Guide covers diabetes management from A to Z.

It includes new chapters on the latest nutrition advice, including counting carbohydrates, identifying healthy carbs, and matching insulin to carbohydrate intake. Specific guidance for using physical activity and exercise to manage diabetes and reduce the risk of future complications is provided, and there's vital information for older adults living with diabetes. There is an expanded chapter for parents and others who have a child with diabetes, as well as new chapters on topics ranging from insulin pumps to sexuality to travel. There is up-to-the-minute information on diabetes medications as well as a glossary--another new feature. How to develop a workable meal plan, advice on managing blood glucose levels, dealing with sick days and administering insulin are among the other subjects included in the Guide.

About the Authors

Dr. Beaser is a widely acclaimed diabetes author, lecturer and clinician. He is currently the medical executive director of Professional Education at Joslin and Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Campbell is a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator and education program manager of Disease Management at Joslin. She is the co-author of several books, including 16 Myths of a 'Diabetic Diet' (published by the American Diabetes Association), which is also available through Joslin's Online Store.

The Joslin Guide evolved from Joslin founder Dr. Elliott P. Joslin's Diabetes Manual, which he wrote in 1918. There were 12 editions of the Manual between 1918 and the 1970s, when it evolved into the Joslin Guide. To download an image of the new book cover, click here: http://www.joslin.org/1083_3162.asp

The World Health Organization reports that approximately 150 million people worldwide have diabetes, and the number is projected to double by the year 2025. In the United States, diabetes affects an estimated 20.8 million children and adults -- 7 percent of the population. An estimated 14.6 million Americans have been diagnosed, leaving 6.2 million Americans unaware that they have the disease. In addition, 41 million Americans are thought to have pre-diabetes, or elevated blood glucose levels that put them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. If untreated or poorly treated, diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney disease, stroke, nerve damage and circulation problems that can result in limb amputations.
-end-
For more information, contact:

Marjorie Dwyer or Jenny Eriksen, Joslin Communications, (617) 732-2415

marjorie.dwyer@joslin.harvard.edu; jenny.eriksen@joslin.harvard.edu

About Joslin Diabetes Center

Joslin Diabetes Center, dedicated to conquering diabetes in all of its forms, is the global leader in diabetes research, care and education. Founded in 1898, Joslin is an independent nonprofit institution affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Joslin research is a team of more than 300 people at the forefront of discovery aimed at preventing and curing diabetes. Joslin Clinic, affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, the nationwide network of Joslin Affiliated Programs, and the hundreds of Joslin educational programs offered each year for clinicians, researchers and patients, enable Joslin to develop, implement and share innovations that immeasurably improve the lives of people with diabetes. As a nonprofit, Joslin benefits from the generosity of donors in advancing its mission. For more information on Joslin, call 1-800-JOSLIN-1 or visit www.joslin.org.

Joslin Diabetes Center

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