Scientific community can help protect sex workers

November 30, 2005

The scientific community should take an active role in improving the day-to-day lives of sex workers by using evidence-based research to pilot harm-reduction strategies, assess existing approaches, and develop a database of proven interventions, states a review published online today (Thursday December 1, 2005) by The Lancet.

Sex work is an extremely dangerous profession that can involve drug-use and exposure to disease, violence, and exploitation. In his summary of peer-reviewed publications, Michael Rekart (University of British Colombia, Vancouver, Canada) concludes that proven harm-reduction strategies exist and can benefit sex workers. Successful interventions include peer education, training in condom-negotiating skills, safety tips for street-based sex workers, male and female condoms, and occupational health and safety guidelines for brothels.

Professor Rekart states: "The use of harm-reduction principles can help safeguard sex workers' lives in the same way that drug users have benefited from drug-use harm reduction...The scientific community can take an active role [in improving the day-to-day lives of sex workers] by using evidence-based research to pilot innovative initiatives, assess existing strategies, and develop a database of proven interventions. The participation of sex workers in this process will ensure its success."
-end-
Contact:
Dr M L Rekart
BC Centre for Disease Control, STD/AIDS Control,
655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver BC, V5Z 4R4, Canada.
T) 604-660-7484
michael.rekart@bccdc.ca

Lancet

Related Scientific Community Articles from Brightsurf:

University of Louisville immunologist summarizes functions of protein family for scientific community
Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) serve as a type of chaperone, coordinating the transport of fatty acids and other molecules between cells.

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias
While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers.

Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community
In a new study in Nature Communications, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center scientists at Michigan State University have focused on understanding more about the plant regions above the soil where these microbes can live, called the 'phyllosphere.' Ashley Shade, MSU assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, and her lab classified core members of this community in switchgrass and miscanthus.

Study: Intelligence community benefits from collaborations, but can do better
An analysis of US intelligence programs aimed at collaborating with academic and industry partners finds that these collaborations are valuable for addressing complex intelligence challenges.

University of Idaho study finds scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth
Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model produced by University of Idaho researchers.

Social and behavioral sciences for the intelligence community
The social and behavioral sciences (SBS) offer an essential contribution to the mission of the U.S.

Community satisfaction demands interaction
Being a good neighbor can have a powerful effect on residents' attitudes and behaviors even for those living in highly disadvantaged communities, according to the results of a new study by a University at Buffalo sociologist.

Community factors and social connection may determine whether sexual minority parents view their community as tolerant versus supportive
A new Family Relations study has found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) parents feel more positive about where they live when that place is more legally, politically, and religiously supportive of LGB people; when there are more LGB-friendly employers; and when there are other LBG-headed households.

UGR researchers put a geophysical database of Antarctica at the disposal of the scientific community
It is the first time that such a large amount of diverse data associated with a research project is freely shared.

Global 'community' rallies for the Reef
Who cares about the Great Barrier Reef? Many people, and according to a paper published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, some of the most passionately connected individuals can come from far away places, across the globe.

Read More: Scientific Community News and Scientific Community Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.