Nav: Home

Vapors from some flavored e-liquids contain high levels of aldehydes

November 30, 2016

Traditional cigarettes pose a well-established risk to smokers' health, but the effects of electronic cigarettes are still being determined. Helping to flesh out this picture, researchers are reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology what happens to e-liquid flavorings when they're heated inside e-cigarettes or electronic nicotine-delivery systems. The study found that when converted into a vapor, some flavorings break down into toxic compounds at levels that exceed occupational safety standards.

Since electronic cigarettes were first introduced to the market in 2003, health officials have been tracking usage and studying potential health effects. A 2015 survey by the National Center for Health Statistics reported that 3.7 percent of adults used the devices regularly, and 12.6 percent had tried them at least once. Some studies have identified the ingredients in e-liquid flavorings, but very little research has been done to determine what happens to them when they are transformed inside the device. A growing body of research on e-cigs has shown that the heat that converts e-liquids into vapor decomposes its contents, producing aldehydes and other toxic compounds that can potentially cause health problems. Andrey Khlystov and colleagues wanted to investigate the specific role that flavorings play in these reactions.

The researchers analyzed vapors created from both unflavored and flavored e-liquids loaded into three popular types of e-cigarettes. The tests for 12 different aldehydes showed that the amount of potentially harmful compounds varied widely across e-liquid brands and flavors. However, the study also showed that in general, one puff of flavored vapor contained levels of aldehydes exceeding the safe thresholds for occupational exposure -- set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists -- by factors of 1.5 to 270. Vapors from unflavored e-liquids contained aldehydes at significantly lower levels.
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from the Desert Research Institute.

The abstract that accompanies this study is available here.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Cigarettes Articles:

What influences adolescents to continuously use e-cigarettes?
In a Public Health Nursing study of adolescents who have used e-cigarettes in the past month, certain factors were associated with frequent use.
E-Cigarettes more effective than counseling alone for smoking cessation
Smokers who received smoking cessation counseling and used electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) containing nicotine were more than twice as likely to successfully quit smoking compared to those who received counseling but did not use e-cigarettes, in a clinical trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Are women using e-cigarettes during preconception and/or pregnancy?
A new study of 1,365 racially/ethnically diverse, low-income pregnant women found that 4% reported e-cigarette use.
An often-made claim that e-cigarettes are '95% safer' is not valid
The frequently cited claim that e-cigarettes are '95% less risky' or '95% less harmful' than combustible cigarettes is outdated, misleading and invalid -- and should no longer be made in discussions on the dangers of vaping, according to an editorial published today in the American Journal of Public Health by six leading experts on e-cigarettes and public health.
Young adults using both e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes at significantly higher risk of stroke
People are looking at e-cigarettes as a 'healthy' alternative to cigarettes and we currently have an epidemic of e-cigarettes use.
Study finds increase in US adults who perceive E-cigarettes more harmful than cigarettes
The number of U.S. adults who perceive e-cigarettes to be at as harmful as, or more harmful than, cigarettes has increased between 2017 and 2018, even prior to the national outbreak of vaping-related lung disease and deaths
E-cigarettes take serious toll on heart health, not safer than traditional cigarettes
E-cigarette use has similar negative effects on cholesterol and glucose as traditional cigarettes.
Electronic cigarettes are not worth the risk say scientists
There is growing evidence that electronic cigarettes have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, reports a paper published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
E-cigarettes: 5 things to know
A practice article about e-cigarettes provides a quick reference on the use of these electronic nicotine delivery systems published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Warnings on individual cigarettes could reduce smoking
Health warnings printed on individual cigarettes could play a key role in reducing smoking, according to new research from the University of Stirling.
More Cigarettes News and Cigarettes Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.