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Acupuncture improved mastectomy recovery in Abbott Northwestern Hospital study

November 30, 2016

MINNEAPOLIS - (Nov.30, 2016) - Women who had acupuncture treatments after breast cancer surgery at Abbott Northwestern Hospital had a greater reduction in pain, nausea, and anxiety and were better able to cope on the first post-operative day compared with patients who had traditional care, according to a study published in the Oncology Nursing Forum in November.

"We are always looking for non-pharmacologic pain management options. This study showed that acupuncture in the hospital after mastectomy is not only feasible, it also appears to decrease patients' symptoms of pain, nausea, and anxiety," said Sue Sendelbach, RN, PhD, director of Nursing Research at Abbott Northwestern.

Researchers chose the study variables -- pain, nausea, anxiety and ability to cope - based on an Oncology Nursing Society survey in which members were asked to report the symptoms that are the most distressing and difficult to manage.

Abbott Northwestern study patients entered their levels -- on a zero to ten scale -- of pain, nausea, anxiety, and ability to cope into a tablet computer immediately before and after receiving acupuncture. Acupuncture was delivered as many as two times after surgery at least 12 hours apart. Patients in the usual care group were seen two times after surgery at least 12 hours apart to collect the same variables.

"The results of this study demonstrate that acupuncture reduced patients' perception of pain, anxiety and nausea by about 1.5 units, which is both clinically and statistically significant. For comparison, it is known that opioid medications reduce patients' perception of pain by 1.9 units, which is comparable to the decrease for acupuncture in this study," said Jeffery A. Dusek, PhD, director of Research for the Penny George™ Institute for Health and Healing.
-end-
The study was funded by the Abbott Northwestern Foundation, and study participants were sought from among patients at the Piper Breast Center® at Abbott Northwestern. When patients are hospitalized at the Virginia Piper Cancer Institute® at Abbott Northwestern, they are eligible to receive integrative medicine services from Penny George™ practitioners. Abbott Northwestern, Virginia Piper Cancer Institute® and Penny George™ Institute for Health and Healing are part of Allina Health.

About Allina Health

Allina Health is dedicated to the prevention and treatment of illness and enhancing the greater health of individuals, families and communities throughout Minnesota and western Wisconsin. A not-for-profit health care system, Allina Health cares for patients from beginning to end-of-life through its 90+ clinics, 13 hospitals, 14 retail pharmacies, specialty care centers and specialty medical services, home care, senior transitions, hospice care, home oxygen and medical equipment and emergency medical transportation services. For more information, visit us at allinahealth.org, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or Healthy Set Go. Contact: Gloria O'Connell, 612-863-4801

Allina Health

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