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Prominent geophysicist Marcia McNutt named 30th DRI Nevada Medalist

November 30, 2016

RENO, Nev. (Nov. 30, 2016) - The Desert Research Institute (DRI) proudly announces the selection of Dr. Marcia McNutt, president of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the National Research Council, as its 2017 DRI Nevada Medalist.

Established in 1988 to acknowledge outstanding achievement in the fields of science and engineering, the DRI Nevada Medal is the highest scientific honor in the state. The 30th DRI Nevada Medal award will be presented by the DRI Foundation during events planned in Reno and Las Vegas in September, 2017.

A distinguished geophysicist, Dr. McNutt's research focuses on marine geophysics, where she has published more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles and helped develop a variety of remote sensing techniques to understand the origin of clusters of volcanoes in the middle of tectonic plates.. From 2013 to 2016, she served as editor-in-chief of the Science family of journals, prior to which she served as director of the U.S. Geological Survey from 2009 to 2013, during which time USGS responded to a number of major disasters, including the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

"I am grateful for the recognition of the Nevada Medal not just for all that it means to me personally, but also because it validates the concept that one can forego one's own personal research career and still have impact through leadership and service to science and the nation," said Dr. McNutt.

As the first female president of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), an independent organization conceived by President Abraham Lincoln and chartered by Congress with providing independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology, McNutt serves on the forefront of science education and communication to the highest levels in US government.

Before joining the USGS in 2009, McNutt served as president and chief executive officer of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), in Moss Landing, California. During her time at MBARI, the institution became a leader in developing biological and chemical sensors for remote ocean deployment, installed the first deep-sea cabled observatory in U.S. waters, and advanced the integration of artificial intelligence into autonomous underwater vehicles for complex undersea missions.

Her previous honors include membership in the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She holds honorary doctoral degrees from the Colorado College, the University of Minnesota, Monmouth University, and the Colorado School of Mines. In 1988, she was awarded the American Geophysical Union's Macelwane Medal for research accomplishments by a young scientist, and she received the Maurice Ewing Medal in 2007 for her contributions to deep-sea exploration.

"Dr. McNutt is a true inspiration," said DRI Acting President, Dr. Robert Gagosian. "She represents the extraordinary achievements that can be accomplished and the significant impact one can have on science and the public's perception of how to solve our most difficult problems and the greatest challenges facing our planet and all of humankind. She is an exceptional mentor and has shaped the careers of so many people with her desire to instill in people her love for science."
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The 30th annual DRI Nevada Medal events are scheduled for Monday, September 25th, 2017 at the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno; and Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas.

Over the last 29 years, the DRI Foundation has honored individuals in science and engineering whose prominent research contributions have ranged from mapping the human genome and explaining protein folding to discovering hydrothermal vents from the ocean floor off the Galapagos and advancing our knowledge of archaeological discoveries across the globe.

Recent recipients of the DRI Nevada Medal include Duke University professor and unmanned systems expert Dr. Missy Cummings; NASA astrobiologist and Mars Science Laboratory mission member Dr. Chris McKay; and National Geographic Explorer and University of California, San Diego research scientist Dr. Albert Yu-Min Lin. A full list of all 29 award recipients is available online at http://www.dri.edu/nvmedal.

The DRI Nevada Medal award includes an eight-ounce minted medallion of .999 pure Nevada silver and $20,000 lecture honorarium.

Learn more about the 2017 DRI Nevada Medal and Dr. Marcia McNutt at http://www.dri.edu.

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is a world leader in environmental sciences through the application of knowledge and technologies to improve people's lives throughout Nevada and the world.

The DRI Foundation serves to cultivate private philanthropic giving in support of the mission and vision of the Desert Research Institute. For over 25 years DRI Foundation trustees have worked with DRI benefactors to support applied environmental research to maximize the Institute's impact on improving people's lives throughout Nevada, the nation, and the world.

Desert Research Institute

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