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Does metabolic syndrome affect cognitive abilities?

November 30, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, November 30, 2016--A new study of U.S. adolescents shows an association between metabolic syndrome and impairments in reading, attention, and working memory. Treatment can control and perhaps even reverse metabolic syndrome, which affects about 9% of teens in the U.S. and 12%-44% of obese adolescents, and may help reduce the cognitive effects described in the study published in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free online on the Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders website.

In the article "Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Cognitive Abilities in U.S. Adolescents," Muni Rubens, MD, MPH, PhD, and coauthors from Florida International University, Miami, and Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, evaluated the results of an array of tests to assess mathematics and reading ability, spatial visualization and motor skills, and working memory and attention. The researchers found impaired capabilities in specific areas associated with components of metabolic syndrome such as elevated systolic blood pressure, increased waist circumference, and higher fasting glucose.
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About the Journal

Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders is the only peer-reviewed journal to focus solely on the pathophysiology, recognition, and treatment of metabolic syndrome. The Journal covers a range of topics including insulin resistance, central obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia with elevated triglycerides, predominance of small dense LDL-cholesterol particles, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress and inflammation. Tables of contents and a free sample issues may be viewed online at the Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Childhood Obesity, Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, and Thyroid. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available online at the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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