Scientists visualize structure of key DNA repair component with 'near-atomic resolution'

November 30, 2017

Cells continuously replicate to repair and replace damaged tissue, and each division requires a reprinting of the cell's genetic blueprints. As the DNA duplicates, errors inevitably occur, resulting in damage that, if left unrepaired, can lead to cellular death.

At the first hint of DNA damage, a protein known as an ATR kinase activates the cell's built-in repair system. Scientists have now imaged this protein at unprecedented resolution, and are beginning to understand its response to DNA damage.

The researchers published the structural information in Science on Dec. 1st.

"The ATR protein is the apical kinase to cope with the DNA damages and replication stress," said Gang Cai, a professor of life sciences at the University of Science & Technology of China in Hefei, China, and the lead author on the paper. "It has long been a central question to determine [the] activation mechanism of ATR kinase--how it responds to DNA damage and how it is activated."

Cai and his team used electron microscopy to image the Mec1-Ddc2 complex at 3.9 ångströms, which is about eight times the size of a single atom of helium. The complex is found in yeast and is the equivalent of the human ATR protein and its cell-signaling protein partner, ATRIP.

The ATR kinase is one of six proteins responsible for maintaining the health of the cell. When this family of proteins identify a problem, such as DNA damage, they instigate the downstream signals needed to repair the damage.

"Cryo-electron microscopy of the Mec1-Ddc2 with state-of-the-art instrumentation has resulted in an electron density map at near-atomic resolution," said Cai, noting that the improved map has confirmed and expanded upon previous findings.

ATR has long been a potential therapeutic target, according to Cai. The high-resolution structural information revealed regulatory sites of the ATR kinase, which are poised to activate at the first hint of DNA damage. Elucidating this mechanism could aid in the development of new therapeutics.

"The structure of [the] yeast member closely resembles those of the human counterpart," said Cai, drawing attention to the substantial similarity in the detailed architecture. "We believe the information acquired from the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 shed light on the architecture and mechanism of [the] human ATR-ATRIP complex."

Cai and his team are now imaging the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 and its human counterpart at different points of activation. They plan to develop more specific and efficient ATR inhibitors to explore the possibility of improving cancer treatments.
-end-
About University of Science and Technology of China

The University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) is a prominent university in China and enjoys an excellent reputation worldwide.

USTC is regarded in China as the "Cradle of Scientific Elites". Its educational principle emphasizes fundamental theories and provides students with a wide range of high-level training that incorporates newly emerging as well as interdisciplinary fields of study. The faculty-to-student ratio is one of the best among Chinese universities. Admission to USTC is extremely selective. Only the top 0.3-0.5 percent of high school graduates are admitted. Over 70 percent of undergraduate students are involved in the Research Program for Undergraduate Students in CAS research institutes or national labs on campus. USTC has the highest percentage of alumni, among Chinese universities, elected as members of CAS and the Chinese Academy of Engineering. Doctoral dissertations at USTC are frequently awarded the Hundred Annual Outstanding Dissertations Prize, which honors the top dissertations from Chinese universities.

University of Science and Technology of China

Related Protein Articles from Brightsurf:

The protein dress of a neuron
New method marks proteins and reveals the receptors in which neurons are dressed

Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.

A new understanding of protein movement
A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing.

A new biotinylation enzyme for analyzing protein-protein interactions
Proteins play roles by interacting with various other proteins. Therefore, interaction analysis is an indispensable technique for studying the function of proteins.

Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles.

A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle.

A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis.

Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation.

Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health.

Read More: Protein News and Protein Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.