Study shows modest improvement in advanced lung cancer overall survival rates

December 01, 2009

Research released in the December 2009 issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology sought to determine whether the survival improvement among patients with metastatic lung cancer has improved over the last two decades as reported in controlled clinical trials.

Researchers performed an analysis of over 100,000 patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) identified through the SEER database to evaluate trends in survival between 1990 and 2005 to assess the true impact of recent medical advances on these patients. Daniel Morgensztern, MD of the Washington University School of Medicine and his team reviewed over 16 years of records from those in the unselected representative patient population and found a modest, but statistically significant, improvement in overall survival rates. Specifically, one-year overall survival increased from 13.2 percent to 19.4 percent. Additionally, two-year overall survival increased from 4.5 percent to 7.8 percent.

Researchers noted the improvement in survival outcomes may reflect changes in the management of advanced NSCLC over the past two decades, including the development of new chemotherapy agents and regimens, increasing use of salvage chemotherapy and the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies.

"Although the development of several new agents led to a statistically significant survival improvement between 1990 and 2005, it is sobering that the one-year survival has improved by only 6 percent during this time," says Dr. Morgensztern. "Real progress can only be achieved with a better understanding of tumor biology and development of novel therapies."
-end-
Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) - (journals.lww.com/jto)

The JTO is rapidly becoming a prized resource for medical specialists and scientists who focus on the detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. The JTO is the official monthly journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC.org) and emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach, including original research (clinical trials and translational or basic research), reviews and opinion pieces.

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Related Medicine Articles from Brightsurf:

An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy.

A new discovery in regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Monash University and Duke-NUS researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.

How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility.

Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017.

Nuclear medicine and COVID-19: New content from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
In one of five new COVID-19-related articles and commentaries published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Johnese Spisso discusses how the UCLA Hospital System has dealt with the pandemic.

Moving beyond 'defensive medicine'
Study shows removing liability concerns slightly increases C-section procedures during childbirth.

NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.

Protein injections in medicine
One day, medical compounds could be introduced into cells with the help of bacterial toxins.

Study reveals complementary medicine use remains hidden to conventional medicine providers
Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.

Study of traditional medicine finds high use in Sub-Saharan Africa despite modern medicine
Researchers who have undertaken the first systematic review of into the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM) in Sub-Saharan Africa found its use is significant and not just because of a lack of resources or access to 'conventional medicine'.

Read More: Medicine News and Medicine Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.