AAO-HNSF partners with SAGE to publish Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

December 01, 2010

Alexandria, VA -The American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS), the nation's largest organization representing ear, nose, and throat surgeons, has partnered with SAGE to publish its official journal, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, beginning with Volume 144 in January 2011.

A leading journal in the field, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery publishes peer-reviewed articles on recent developments in treatment of the ear, nose, throat, and related structures of the head.

"Our organizational mission is to empower otolaryngologist--head and neck surgeons to deliver the best patient care. This journal is one of the primary ways we help physicians to have access to the diverse research that they need to provide the highest patient care. We chose SAGE in part because of their partnership with HighWire Press, and because we found the staff creative, flexible, and committed to helping expand our reach and impact, "said David R. Nielsen, MD, Executive Vice President and CEO of the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery.

The AAO-HNS and its Foundation sponsor continuing medical education, professional meetings, new scientific research, and practice management guidance for more than 13,000 ear, nose, and throat specialists in the United States and globally. The Academy also monitors federal medical-related legislation and educates legislators and policy makers about the needs and concerns of otolaryngologists.

"We are delighted to have been selected as the new publishing partner of the AAO-HNSF and welcome Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery to our growing list of surgery titles," said Jayne Marks, SAGE Vice President and Editorial Director, Library Information Group. "The Academy is passionately committed to the dissemination of high quality information to improve patient care. SAGE's commitment to education and the dissemination of knowledge makes this a proactive and dynamic partnership. We will be building on the excellent foundation the Academy has created and aim to create further value for their member."
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Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery is the official scientific journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF). Reporters who wish to obtain more information on the new transition should contact Mary Stewart at 1-703-535-3762, or at newsroom@entnet.org.

About the AAO-HNS

The American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (www.entnet.org), one of the oldest medical associations in the nation, represents nearly 12,000 physicians and allied health professionals who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the ears, nose, throat, and related structures of the head and neck. The Academy serves its members by facilitating the advancement of the science and art of medicine related to otolaryngology and by representing the specialty in governmental and socioeconomic issues. The organization's vision: "Empowering otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeons to deliver the best patient care.

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

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