More focus on finances needed to increase Latino science and math graduates

December 01, 2010

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) -- A recently released report co-written by a University of California, Riverside professor argues that more attention needs to placed on finances to increase the number of Latino students graduating in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

The authors of the report - Lindsey E. Malcom, an assistant professor of education at UC Riverside, Alicia C. Dowd, an associate professor at USC, and Terrence Yu, a consulting researcher - found STEM majors with more financial support from their parents were more likely to graduate from highly selective institutions than students with less support.

"Our findings reveal yet another way that Latina and Latino students are disadvantaged in the current context of rising college costs and falling non-load financial aid," Malcom said.

The report, "Tapping HSI-STEM Funds to Improve Latina and Latino Access to STEM Professions," comes at time of increased attention on increasing the number of Latino students trained in the STEM fields.

Earlier this year, President Barack Obama signed the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, which infuses $100 million annually through 2019 to increase degree attainment in STEM fields at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). HSI is a federal designation for colleges and universities where at least 25 percent of the full-time equivalent undergraduate enrollment is Hispanic. (UC Riverside is one of only four research universities with the HSI designation.)

The report is the third in a series released the past two years by the Center for Urban Education at USC. The reports, funded by a $670,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, aim to increase the number of Latino STEM graduates.

The report offers a list of recommendations for HSI schools seeking the federal grants:The report divided Latino students into three categories - self-support, parental support and balanced support - based on sources of financial support they used to pay for college.

Only 26 percent of self-supporters graduated from a research university, compared to 46 percent of those parentally supported and 42 percent with balanced support.

Similarly, self-supporters attended institutions of lesser prestige. Only 21 percent of self-supporters attended highly selective institutions, compared to 32 with parental support and 34 percent with balanced support.
-end-
To view the report and previous reports in the series visit: http://cue.usc.edu/news/nsf.html.

University of California - Riverside

Related Education Articles from Brightsurf:

Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning--a subset of artificial intelligence--in science education.

Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations.

How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic?

Online education platforms could scale high-quality STEM education for universities
Online and blended (online and in-person) STEM instruction can produce the same learning outcomes for students as traditional, in-person classes at a fraction of the cost, finds research published today in Science Advances.

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.

The new racial disparity in special education
Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it's more complex than previously thought.

Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US
A first-of-its-kind study estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity.

How education may stave off cognitive decline
Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci.

Does more education stem political violence?
In a study released online today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, three Norwegian researchers attempt to bring clarity to this question by undertaking the first systematic examination of quantitative research on this topic.

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special education
Gone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school.

Read More: Education News and Education Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.