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Lung treatment may help patients with severe emphysema

December 01, 2014

The first long-term clinical trial on the use of Lung Volume Reduction (LVR-) Coil treatment in patients with severe emphysema has found that the minimally-invasive therapy, which enables the lung to function more effectively, is safe over a 3-year period. The results are published in Respirology.

The trial revealed that half of the patients continued to improve their lung function capacity, feelings of breathlessness, and overall quality of life after 3 years, with no unexpected safety issues.

"This trial reports only the first ever treated patients in the world with this device," said lead author Dr. Jorine Hartman. Future studies in larger numbers of patients are needed to identify those who will benefit from this treatment.
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Wiley

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