Engineering academic elected a Fellow of the IEEE

December 01, 2015

A University of Bristol academic has been elected a Fellow of the world's largest and most prestigious professional association for the advancement of technology.

Ian Craddock, a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Director of the SPHERE IRC and Managing Director of Toshiba's Telecommunications Research Laboratory, has been named a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in recognition of his leadership in electromagnetic imaging for healthcare applications.

Professor Craddock's appointment reflects both his unique research contributions into electromagnetic imaging, as applied to the early detection of cancer, but also his leadership of large teams of researchers in the £15 million SPHERE IRC and within Toshiba's successful research laboratory in Bristol.

Professor Andrew Nix, Dean of Engineering, said: "The Faculty is delighted Ian has been elected a Fellow of the IEEE. It is a great accolade and I am thrilled for Ian. This is an excellent achievement and reflects not only the engineering excellence for the Department but also for the Faculty and the University."

The IEEE has over 400,000 members in more than 160 countries and is a leading authority on a wide range of areas from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.

An IEEE Fellow is conferred upon a person with an outstanding record of achievement in any of the IEEE fields of interest. 301 individuals have been elevated to IEEE Fellow in 2016.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 per cent of the world's literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 900 active industry standards. The organisation also sponsors or co-sponsors nearly 400 international technical conferences each year.
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University of Bristol

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