Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents

December 01, 2020

PHILADELPHIA (December 1, 2020) - More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals.

In an article in JMIR Nursing, researchers explain how they applied user-centered design principles to develop a mobile health (mhealth) app to improve HPV vaccine uptake and how its use was evaluated with parents and parent-adolescent dyads. The app -- Vaccipack -- is exclusively focused on adolescent vaccines and targets key parental beliefs related to HPV vaccines. The mhealth app is designed for parents (to use and share with their adolescents) to promote the initiation and completion of the HPV vaccine series in their adolescent children.

The study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) evaluated the acceptability of and intention to use the app. It found that intention to use the app was high among both parents and adolescents after being introduced to the app and given time explore it.

"Theory-based content design, although standard practice in behavioral intervention research, has not been a typical approach adopted by app developers," says Anne M. Teitelman, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing at Penn Nursing. "Evaluation of acceptability and likely use, as we present here, is an important preliminary step for developing apps and in designing behavioral interventions that are most likely to achieve the desired health outcome." Teitelman is the lead investigator of the study and among the developers of the app.
-end-
The article, "Vaccipack, A Mobile App to Promote Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Uptake Among Adolescents Aged 11 to 14 Years: Development and Usability Study" is available online.

Coauthors of the article include Joshua Jayasinghe, BSN, PhD; Ja H. Koo1, BSN; and Annet Davis, RN, MSW, all of Penn Nursing; Emily F. Gregory MD, MHS and Kristen A. Feemster, MD, MPH, MSHP, both of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Zara Wermers of xTufts University; Jennifer F. Morone, RN, MA-ATR, PhD of Yale University; and Damien C. Leri, MPH, MS-Ed of Big Yellow Star, Inc.

About the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is one of the world's leading schools of nursing. For the fifth year in a row, it is ranked the #1 nursing school in the world by QS University and is consistently ranked highly in the U.S. News & World Report annual list of best graduate schools. Penn Nursing is currently ranked # 1 in funding from the National Institutes of Health, among other schools of nursing, for the third consecutive year. Penn Nursing prepares nurse scientists and nurse leaders to meet the health needs of a global society through innovation in research, education, and practice. Follow Penn Nursing on: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, & Instagram.

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Related Human Papillomavirus Articles from Brightsurf:

The National Human Genome Research Institute publishes new vision for human genomics
The National Human Genome Research Institute this week published its 'Strategic vision for improving human health at The Forefront of Genomics' in the journal Nature.

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases.

Powerful human-like hands create safer human-robotics interactions
A team of engineers designed and developed a novel humanoid hand that may be able to help human-robotic interactions.

Human embryo-like model created from human stem cells
Scientists have developed a new model to study an early stage of human development, using human embryonic stem cells.

Human papillomavirus confers radiosensitivity in oropharyngeal cancer cells
The cover for issue 16 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'Radiation-induced DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX foci formation at a specified time point after 10 Gy irradiation,' by Zhang, et al.

The Lancet: 2019 novel coronavirus is genetically different to human SARS and should be considered a new human-infecting coronavirus
A new genetic analysis of 10 genome sequences of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) from nine patients in Wuhan finds that the virus is most closely related to two bat-derived SARS-like coronaviruses, according to a study published in The Lancet.

'Substantially human,' a good starting point for determining boundaries of what's human
Recent and rapid developments in the biosciences continually blur the lines between human beings and other living organisms, while straining the legal definitions of what is or is not human.

Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet
Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives.

Cervical cancer is more aggressive when human papillomavirus is not detected
Cervical cancer negative for the human papillomavirus (HPV) is rare but more aggressive: it is more frequently diagnosed at advanced stages, with more metastasis and reduced survival.

Human history through tree rings: Trees in Amazonia reveal pre-colonial human disturbance
The Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) is well known around the world today and has been an important part of human subsistence strategies in the Amazon forest from at least the Early Holocene.

Read More: Human Papillomavirus News and Human Papillomavirus Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.