AGU Fall Meeting -- Media advisory 4

December 02, 2007

Contents of this message

1. Final Press Conference List
2. Press Conference Call-ins
3. Attention PIOs: Sending Press Releases to Fall Meeting
4. Delta Field Trip Itinerary
5. Reminder: NCSWA Holiday Dinner, Wednesday 12 December
6. Special Lectures
7. Where Do I Pick Up My Press/News Media Badge?
8. News Media Registration Information
9. Who's Coming

Please see:

Media Advisories 1, 2, and 3 on the Fall Meeting news media page for information not repeated here: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/?content=media




  1. Final Press Conference List

    The following schedule of press conferences is subject to change, before or during Fall Meeting. Press conferences may be added or dropped, their titles and emphases may change, and participants may change. All updates to this schedule will be announced in the Press Room (2012 Moscone West). Press conferences take place in the Press Conference Room (2010 Moscone West), which is adjacent.

    *****
    The Brightest Night-Shining Clouds Ever Seen
    Monday, 10 December
    0900h

    NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite has captured the first global-scale view of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) over the entire 2007 Northern Hemisphere season, with an unprecedented horizontal resolution of eight square kilometers (three square miles). Scientists will report on the brightest clouds ever observed, how widespread they are, and how their brightness changes and builds as a reflection of ongoing changes in the Earth's mesosphere.

    Participants:

    James Russell III: AIM Principal Investigator, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia, USA

    Scott Bailey: AIM Deputy Principal Investigator, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA

    Gary Thomas: AIM Co-Investigator, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Sessions SA13B/SA14A/SA21A

    *****
    Climate impacts on wildfire intensity
    Monday, 10 December
    1000h

    Where, how and why do wildfires burn severely? Fire, climate, and vegetation dynamics are inextricably linked in forest and rangeland ecosystems. Drought-stressed vegetation results in more dead fuels and lower fuel moistures that can fuel more intense fires of greater severity. Drought-stressed vegetation is also more vulnerable to attack and more likely to die from bark beetles and other forest insect pests, which in turn creates more dry fuel for severe wildfires. The abundance, type, and distribution of fuel available to fire changes rapidly, and the dynamics are highly variable and complex.

    Participants:

    Penelope Morgan: Professor, Department of Forest Resources, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA

    Colin Hardy: Acting Program Manager, Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Missoula, Montana, USA

    Eric Kasischke: Professor of Biogeography, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA

    Sessions B11D/B13E/B14C

    *****
    Voyager 2 proves the solar system is "squashed"
    Monday, 10 December
    1100h

    NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft has followed Voyager 1 into the solar system's final frontier, a vast region at the edge of our solar system where the solar wind hits the thin gas between the stars. However, Voyager 2 took a different path, entering this region, called the heliosheath, on 30 August 2007. Because Voyager 2 crossed the heliosheath boundary, called the solar wind termination shock, around 20 billion kilometers [10 billion miles] away from Voyager 1 and almost two billion kilometers [one billion miles] closer to the Sun, it confirmed that our solar system is "squashed" or "dented"--that is, the bubble carved into interstellar space by the solar wind is asymmetric. Scientists say the new data on the solar wind termination shock are still being pondered, but it is clear that Voyager has surprised them again.

    Participants:

    Edward C. Stone: Voyager Mission Scientist, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA

    John D. Richardson: Voyager Plasma Science Principal Investigator, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    Robert B. Decker: Voyager Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, USA

    Leonard F. Burlaga: Voyager Magnetometer, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA

    Sessions SH11A/SH12B/SH14A

    *****
    Urban Air Quality
    Monday, 10 December
    1300h

    Advances in real-time and near real-time air pollutant measurement technology and improved air quality models are allowing scientists to better understand the interplay between pollutant emission sources and atmospheric processes that lead to serious air pollution and to design more effective air quality management practices. Special sessions on urban air quality at this meeting highlight innovative field measurement programs in Beijing, Mexico City, and Houston that have yielded important insights into the impacts of both primary (directly emitted) pollutant sources and atmospheric chemistry processes that produce secondary gaseous and fine particulate matter pollutants.

    Participants:

    Luisa T. Molina: Lead scientist, MCMA-2006 /MILAGRO; Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MCE2), La Jolla, California, USA

    Tong Zhu: Principal Investigator, CARE Beijing Project; College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China

    Scott Herndon: Participant in MCMA-2003 and MCMA-2006; Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, Massachusetts, USA

    David Parrish: Participant in TexAQS-2006; Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth systems Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Session A11D

    *****
    Earthquake early warning systems today
    Monday, 10 December
    1400h

    In October 2007, the first national earthquake early warning system was activated in Japan. It can provide seconds to tens of seconds warning prior to ground shaking and is being used to mitigate the impact of earthquakes. Taiwan, Turkey, Romania, and Mexico also have active early warning systems, and methodologies are being developed and tested in other earthquake-prone regions in Asia, Europe, and the U.S. The press conference will highlight the experience of the Japanese (Kamigaichi), coordinated development efforts across Europe (Gasparini), and the results of the current real-time testing of early warning methodologies in the U.S. (Allen).

    Participants:

    Richard M. Allen: Seismological Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California, USA

    Paolo Gasparini: Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli "Federico II", Naples, Italy

    Osamu Kamigaichi: Seismological and Volcanological Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan

    Sessions S13C/S21D/S23E/S24B

    *****
    Mars Rovers Survive the Dust, Follow the Water
    Monday, 10 December
    1500h

    NASA's rovers Spirit and Opportunity, nearly four years into missions originally planned for three months, continue adding to evidence about water's role in past Martian environments. This fall, Spirit is examining the top of a low plateau in the vicinity of silica-rich deposits that may have formed in hydrothermal environments similar to ones that support microbial ecosystems on Earth. Opportunity is inspecting layered deposits inside a half-mile-wide crater in the Meridiani Region. Complementary studies of the Meridiani region from orbit show that clay-rich deposits and ancient cratered terrain cut by fluvial channels underlie the thick stack of sulfate-rich layers that the rover is sampling from the top. The combined vantages tell a long history of how hydrology of this region evolved. Spirit's solar panels remain quite dusty, making the approaching winter's low sunshine another real threat to the rover's survival.

    Participants:

    John Callas: project manager for NASA Mars Exploration Rovers, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA

    Steven Squyres: Goldwin Smith Professor of Planetary Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA; principal investigator for science payload of NASA Mars Exploration Rovers

    Sessions P21C/P23A

    *****
    New Discoveries About Northern Lights
    Tuesday, 11 December
    0900h

    A new NASA spacecraft, THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms), has revealed the dynamics of a rapidly developing substorm, confirmed the existence of giant magnetic ropes, and detected small explosions in the outskirts of Earth's magnetic field that affect the solar wind. Participants will describe vivid auroras that surged westward twice as fast as anyone thought possible, crossing 15 degrees of longitude in less than one minute, and the unprecedented power of the substorm which occurred on 23 March 2007. Where does all that energy come from? THEMIS may have found the answer.

    Participants:

    Vassilis Angelopoulos: THEMIS Principal Investigator, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA

    David Sibeck: THEMIS Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA

    Jonathan Eastwood, THEMIS researcher, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA

    Sessions SM11A/SM13D/SM14A/SM21C/SM22A/SM23A

    *****
    New frontiers in predicting precipitation
    Tuesday, 11 December
    1000h

    Will it rain tomorrow? Next month? Scientists are close to breakthroughs in predicting precipitation. Researchers from the Global Energy and Water Cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) will report on recent major achievements and planned future activities. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission scientist will discuss the next generation of weather and climate studies. Long range and seasonal precipitation predictability linked to global phenomena, such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), will be explained by a member of the U.S. CLImate VARiability and Predictability (CLIVAR) MJO Working Group. The researchers will outline the need for information on such factors as in-cloud precipitation processes and microphysical variables that would enhance precipitation predictability.

    Participants:

    Rick Lawford: Director, International GEWEX Project Office, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA

    Peter van Oevelen: European GEWEX Coordinator, International GEWEX Project Office, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA

    Arthur Hou: Mission Scientist, GPM Mission, and Senior Scientist, Earth Sciences Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA

    Duane Waliser: Principal Scientist, Water and Carbon Cycles, Science Division, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Visiting Associate Faculty, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA

    Sessions H24C/H31B

    *****
    New Mars Orbiter Reveals Details of Canyon System and "Spiders"
    Tuesday, 11 December
    1100h

    New images reveal that layered deposits inside Mars' Candor Chasma, part of the largest canyon system in the solar system, are younger than the canyon. These deposits contain abundant chemical evidence of water-driven processes, and earlier studies had left ambiguity about whether the deposits formed within the near-equatorial canyon system or were deposited after the canyon opened. Stereo, high-resolution imagery from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter allows researchers to interpret the geological history of the site by resolving the meter scale topography and other key details of folds and faults within these layers. Elsewhere, the same camera and the orbiter's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars aid in the understanding of so-called "cryptic terrain" near Mars' permanent southern polar cap. This landscape of spiders, lacework, and lizard skin textures bears evidence of gas jets bursting upward from seasonal vents and depositing bright and dark fans downwind from the vents.

    Participants:

    Chris Okubo: Collaborator, High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Candice Hansen: Deputy Principal Investigator, High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA

    Timothy Titus: Participating scientist, Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Astrogeology Team, U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA

    Sessions P23D/P24A

    *****
    Snow pack decline signals need to act
    Tuesday, 11 December
    1300h

    The hydrology, i.e., snow pack, river flows, etc., of the western U.S. has been changing over the last 50 years. The reason for these changes has never been conclusively determined, although conjecture abounds. Research presented in this session attributes these hydrological changes to climate alterations caused by greenhouse gases. Several computer models have simulated the changes remarkably well. These same models predict a future crisis in water supply, agriculture, and the environment, due to greenhouse gases--impacts which it may be too late to avoid. Since the prediction models explained the last 50 years, the researchers urge policy makers to act on the predictions, adding that there is little time left in which to do so.

    Participants:

    Tim P. Barnett: Research Marine Physicist, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA

    Ben Santer: Senior Research Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, USA

    Session GC24A

    *****
    High-elevation climate change and lower elevation impacts
    Tuesday, 11 December
    1500h

    New data from Glacier National Park, Montana, show that model predictions from as recently as the 1990s proved overly conservative. This includes glacial retreat rates and cascading effects on high-elevation ecological systems, including critical spawning areas for threatened bull trout. In Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, interaction between recent temperature trends, increases in atmospheric nitrogen deposition, and precipitation portend significant regime shifts in alpine ecosystems. Desert dust storms in the southwestern U.S affect the duration of snowpack in the Rockies. Historical analysis of the effects of dust on snow retention show effects starting in the late 1800s, coinciding with changes in land use in the southwest, increasing dust amounts by about a factor of five, compared to the last 5,000 years. These effects increased dramatically over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

    Participants:

    Thomas H. Painter, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

    Daniel B. Fagre, Ecologist, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Jill Baron, Research Ecologist, Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

    Sessions GC31C/GC32A/GC33B/GC41A

    *****
    Arctic changes in 2007 set records
    Wednesday, 12 December
    0900h

    2007 has been a remarkable year for dramatic step changes in environmental conditions in the Arctic. The extent of the sea ice cover fell to a record minimum in September, breaking the previous record by 23 percent. Summer Arctic Ocean surface temperatures were much warmer than in years previous by up to about five degrees Celsius [nine degrees Fahrenheit]. This level of warming of the upper layer of the central Arctic Ocean has never before been observed. These phenomena were largely the result of solar heating of the upper ocean, although northward-flowing warm Pacific waters also played a role. The year also set a new record of melting snow over the Greenland ice sheet, with snowmelt for areas above 2000 meters [7,000 feet] 150 percent greater than the 1988 - 2006 average. The increased melting does not seem to be connected to changes in absorbed solar radiation, but it is likely a consequence of extremely warm temperatures over the Greenland ice sheet.

    Participants:

    Michael Steele: Polar Science Center - Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

    Donald K. Perovich: U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA

    John D. Walsh: President's Professor of Global Change, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

    Marco Tedesco: University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA

    Sessions U33B/U41C

    *****
    Carbon sequestration in the real world
    Wednesday, 12 December
    1000h

    The sequestration of carbon underground, in the oceans, and in the biosphere has the potential to play a significant role in climate change mitigation. Such efforts are, however, beset by technical, economic, political, and environmental concerns. Participants in this press conference will offer new perspectives on how novel carbon sequestration techniques fit into public conversations regarding carbon pricing, the economics of energy, and U.S. and international policy. Fessenden works on monitoring, measurement, and verification of geologic carbon sequestration. Kriegler examines the economic feasibility of free air carbon capture--an emerging alternative to on-site sequestration strategies. Caldeira will speak on opportunities and challenges related to sequestration of carbon dioxide in the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere.

    Participants:

    Julianna Fessenden: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    Elmar Kriegler: Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

    Kenneth G. Caldeira: Department of Global Ecology, The Carnegie Institution, Stanford, California, USA

    Sessions U41D/U42A/U43C

    *****
    The secret life of clouds: Recent data from CloudSat and the A-Train
    Wednesday, 12 December
    1100h

    A little more than a year and a half into its primary mission, NASA's CloudSat satellite, working in tandem with the other Earth observing satellites in NASA's "A-Train," is yielding a treasure trove of new data that are helping scientists better understand the enormous influence clouds have on Earth's weather, climate and energy balance. Recent results include discovery of a link between observed decreases in polar clouds last summer and a corresponding loss of Arctic sea ice, changing the amount of solar radiation that flows to the Arctic surface and warming the Arctic Ocean. CloudSat data have yielded surprising new global estimates of how frequently clouds rain over Earth's oceans, suggesting the need to reassess the intensity of Earth's water cycle and its impact on climate models. CloudSat also provided the first global evidence that small particles in Earth's atmosphere, known as aerosols, may be polluting clouds, making them more reflective.

    Participants:

    Graeme Stephens: CloudSat Principal Investigator, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

    John Haynes: Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

    Jennifer E. Kay: National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Sessions A11E/A12A/A14A/ A14D/A21E/A23A/A33F/A/41D/A42C/A53D

    *****
    Undersea drilling reveals mechanics of earthquakes, tsunamis
    Wednesday, 12 December
    1300h

    Chikyu, the world's largest research drilling vessel, in operation for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program for the first time, has completed its initial 8-week leg of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE). This research program, to continue until 2012, has begun drilling into an underwater earthquake zone off the southwest coast of Japan to study fault mechanics and the state and interseismic behavior of the M8 seismogenic zone. Preliminary results include data gathered from logging-while-drilling at six sites where the vessel will eventually build observatories. Geophysical logs and downhole measurements were made to determine the properties of the rocks surrounding each borehole. Images of the borehole walls provide data on stress conditions at each site.

    Participants:

    Harold Tobin: Co-chief Scientist of IODP Expedition 314; Associate Professor, Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    Moe Kyaw Thu: Expedition Staff Scientist, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology (JAMSTEC), Tokyo, Japan

    Demian Saffer: NanTroSeIZE specialty coordinator; Assistant Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA

    J. Casey Moore: Professor of Earth Science, University of California - Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, USA

    Sessions T51E/T52A/T53A

    *****
    Recycling Saturn's rings
    Wednesday, 12 December
    1400h

    Sustainability through recycling may be the reason why Saturn's rings persist. Support is mounting for hypotheses that the rings may be a permanent, not temporary, feature of the solar system. Ring scientists once thought the rings were no older than the dinosaurs, a temporary feature destined to dissipate over time. But new observations from Cassini show that even when ring particles fragment into groups of smaller particles, they tend to come back together, re-clumping to maintain the overall ring structure.

    Participants:

    Larry W. Esposito: Cassini Principal Investigator for the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph, Laboratory for Atmospheric Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Miodrag Sremcevic: Research Associate and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph team member, Laboratory for Atmospheric Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Sessions P43B/P53E

    *****
    IPCC, the Nobel Prize, and Beyond
    Wednesday, 12 December
    1600h

    As Fall Meeting gets underway on 10 December, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will receive the Nobel Peace Prize, shared with former Vice President Al Gore. The award praised IPCC for "dissemination of greater knowledge" and is the first Nobel Peace Prize to directly link science and peace. The future of IPCC will depend upon the decisions made by governments in the spring and fall of next year. Solomon, returning from the Nobel award ceremony in Oslo, Norway, will discuss what the Peace Prize means from her perspective as a leader of IPCC's influential Fourth Assessment Report, and she will describe future challenges to making scientific assessments of climate change.

    Participant:

    Susan Solomon: Co-chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group One; Senior Scientist, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Sessions U41A/U43D

    *****
    Climate tipping points: Are we there yet?
    Thursday, 13 December
    0900h

    Abrupt changes in climate are an established phenomenon in Earth's history, and there is growing concern that our planet may be at a "tipping point" of dramatic climate change, due this time to human influences. This briefing will present the latest results from the perspective of global climate, as well as potential impacts on three key regions of the globe. Hansen discusses the "unrealized" global warming of Earth's climate system and the resulting need for urgent action to cut emissions beyond carbon dioxide. Alley discusses the possibility that sustained warming of a few decades could produce major ice sheet losses that would last centuries. Webster reports on a societal tipping point along three heavily populated Asian river basins. Comiso reports that this year's large Arctic sea ice decline may be the tipping point.

    Participants:

    Richard Alley: Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA

    Josefino Comiso: Senior Research Scientist for Polar Oceanography, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA

    James Hansen: Director, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies; Adjunct Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

    Peter Webster: Professor, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    Session GC44A

    *****
    Jupiter's enormous magnetosphere
    Thursday, 13 December
    1000h

    Participants will concentrate on observations made by the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Jupiter on its way to Pluto in Spring 2007. Its trajectory took it down the center of the tail of Jupiter's magnetosphere, which is roughly 100 times larger than that of Earth and encompasses the orbits of the Galilean moons. The innermost moon, Io, ejects about a ton per second of volcanic gases that become ionized, trapped, and accelerated in Jupiter's strong magnetic field. The New Horizons particle detectors measured bursts of these iogenic charged particles streaming away from the planet for around three months, as the spacecraft flew down the magnetotail.

    Participants:

    Frances Bagenal: Team leader, New Horizons plasma investigations; Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Laboratory of Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Ralph McNutt: Principal Investigator, New Horizons particle detector PEPSSI, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, USA

    Dave McComas: Principal Investigator, New Horizons particle detector SWAP, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, USA

    Sessions SM44A/SM52A/SM53A

    *****
    Preparing to explore Europa
    Thursday, 13 December
    1500h

    The space science community is now ready to explore Jupiter's icy moon Europa, especially its presumed ice-covered ocean. McKinnon will describe the current view of Europa and address the question of habitability. Blankenship will report on new research that has improved our understanding of Europa, focusing on radar sounding to search for water. Doran will report on plans for a February 2008 field demonstration and ultimate Antarctic deployment of an autonomous underwater robotic vehicle, designed as a prototype ocean explorer for Europa.

    Participants:

    William B. McKinnon: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for Space, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

    Donald D. Blankenship: Research Scientist, Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA

    Peter Doran: Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

    Sessions P51E/P52A/P53B

    *****
    Geoengineering Earth's climate
    Thursday, 13 December
    1600h

    "Geoengineering" refers to deliberately modifying the Earth's climate system, such as injecting particles into the stratosphere to block incoming sunlight. While reducing solar radiation will certainly produce a cooling effect, how well would it work, and what might be adverse consequences, such as reduction in precipitation, especially in the Asian monsoon region? This press conference will include new results from various climate modeling groups in which sulfate aerosols are injected into the stratosphere or mirrors are used to deflect some sunlight. Papers also will address the history of planetary geoengineering, observations of reductions of precipitation after the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, and schemes to increase the reflectivity of oceanic clouds or continental areas. Participants will present the state of the art of scientific studies on the efficacy and safety of proposed geoengineering schemes to modify incoming solar radiation.

    Participants:

    Alan Robock: Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA

    Richard Turco: Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Kenneth G. Caldeira: Department of Global Ecology, The Carnegie Institution, Stanford, California, USA

    Session GC52A/A43E

  2. Press conference call-ins

    Call-ins by reporters to the press conferences are welcome. Here are the phone numbers and access code for doing so:

    From USA and Canada, call (toll free): +1 888 481 3032

    From other locations, call: +1 617 801 9600

    When prompted, please enter this access code: 115139

    This code remains the same for all press conferences. However, you must place a separate call for each one, even in consecutive hours.

  3. Attention PIOs: Sending Press Releases to Fall Meeting

    Public information officers of universities, government agencies, and research institutions are encouraged to disseminate press releases and related documentation at Fall Meeting. We recommend around 50 copies of printed materials and three-to-five copies of broadcast quality videotapes (Beta format).

    The easiest way to get these materials to the Press Room is to take them yourself, if you are going to Fall Meeting, or to give them to one of your scientists, with instructions to deliver them to Room 2012 Moscone West, from Monday, 10 December.

    If you prefer, you may send these materials by FedEx, UPS, or DHL to the following address:

    Peter Weiss
    San Francisco Marriott Hotel
    55 Fourth Street
    San Francisco, California 94103

    Phone: +1-415-896-1600

    Express shipments to the above address should be timed to arrive on Friday, 7 December, or after. They will be displayed from 10 December or as soon as received.

    Remaining materials may be collected from Room 2012 on Friday, 14 December, at 1300h, after which they will be scrapped.

  4. Delta Field Trip Itinerary

    Sunday, 9 December

    Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta levees: Greater danger than in New Orleans?

    The vast system of waterways and levees that sprawls between the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers in Northern California and that supplies water to two-thirds of the state's residents faces potentially catastrophic failure from a major earthquake. Short of a major disaster, other problems from many human-made and natural processes are also on the rise. This tour will take participants to sites where water is pumped and shunted around the Delta and where seismic and other threats--including land subsidence, intrusion of saltwater, and increasing levels of development on floodplains--are evident.
    • 0800-1730h (approximately)
    • Departing from and returning to Moscone Convention Center West, 800 Howard Street, at Fourth Street, San Francisco
    • Box lunches provided (vegetarian options included)
    • Presenters: Michael A. Miller, Tour Coordinator for the California Department of Water Resources, and Thomas L. Holzer, engineering geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey

    Itinerary:

    0815h - Participants assemble, receive badges, printed materials and box lunches, then board bus. Allow time to park or allow for BART and Muni Sunday schedules.

    0830h Sharp! - Bus departs.

    0930h-1015h - Visit the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Tracy Pumping Plant, one of the giant mechanical hearts that keeps water moving through the system of aqueducts and waterways that crisscross the San Joaquin. The state government also operates similar pumps at the Harvey O. Banks Pumping Plant about 1 mile away.

    1045h-1115h - Tour of the Jones Tract, where a levee break on 3 June 2004, due to unknown causes, flooded 12,000 acres of farmland to an average depth of 12 feet. The breakage and flooding , which took until the end of 2004 to repair, prompted extraordinary measures to protect fresh water supplies from increasing salinity. Also, observe both an area along Whiskey Island Road that has remained much as the Delta was before people began reshaping the landscape and a sunken island known as Mildred Island.

    1215h-1235h - Delta Cross Channel. This is the first re-plumbing of the Delta and is the key to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Central Valley Project. Large radial gates installed by the Bureau control water flow from the Sacramento River to the San Joaquin River.

    1300-1310h - Drive along Jackson Slough Road, where the levee passes directly over the Vacaville Fault which last broke in 1892. This leg of the tour shows land subsidence and an abandoned slough.

    1310h-1335h - Observe one of the most dramatic examples of land subsidence in the Delta at Twitchell Island. The land on one side of the levee has dropped 20 to 30 feet below the river on the other side. On the island there is also an area where the California Department of Water Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are doing some investigations on subsidence recovery and it's the site of a relatively recent levee repair (1990s) using innovative techniques.

    1345h-1415h - Eat lunch (box lunches provided, compliments of AGU) and take in some Delta views at Windy Cove State Park.

    1505h-1525h - Suisin Marsh - Salinity Control Gates

    1525h - Bus departs Suisin Marsh, arriving in San Francisco at approximately 1730h. (If time allows, we will stop at an East Bay BART station for any participants who wish to return home by BART.)

    Note: This schedule is tentative and subject to change with regard to time, presenters, topics, and sites visited.

    CONFIRMED AND WAIT LISTED PARTICIPANTS

    Those currently Confirmed and on the Wait List are noted in Who's Coming (linked from Item 9, below). We anticipate clearing several Wait Listed people in the coming days, and they will be so notified. Those still on the Wait List on 9 December are encouraged to arrive at the starting point by 0800, to be eligible to take the place of any no-shows.

    If you are Confirmed and your plans change so that you cannot participate, please inform Harvey Leifert as soon as possible. Between 7 and 9 December, call him at +1-301-785-5977 (cell); leave a message, if necessary.

    The trip will take place rain or shine. Check the weather forecast for Tracy, California, and take a raincoat, poncho, or umbrella--and appropriate foot gear-- if there is a likelihood of rain.

    Reminder to all: Please eat breakfast before the trip. Lunch (provided by AGU) is scheduled for 1345h (1:45 p.m.) The bus will carry extra beverages, available both before and after lunch.

  5. Reminder: NCSWA Holiday Dinner, Wednesday 12 December

    For further information, see: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/prrl/2007-24.html#four

  6. Special Lectures

    Fall Meeting features a series of lectures by eminent scientists. See (and scroll down): http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/?content=program#unionLectures

  7. Where Do I Pick Up My Press/News Media Badge?

    Online registration is now closed. Those members of the news media who have preregistered online for the meeting and are on the Who's Coming list (see Item 9 below) must pick up their Press/News Media badges in the main registration area, not in the Press Room. Look for the one booth marked Press/News Media. Do not get on the main registration lines!

    Others who have not yet registered may do so on site. This year, the registration booths are located in the street level Exhibition Hall of Moscone West, not in the lobby as in past years. Moscone West is at the corner of 4th and Howard Streets.

    If you are registering on-site, you must fill out a News Media Registration Form and present it at the Press/News Media booth. Please be sure to have appropriate proof of your status, per Item 8, below. Your badge will be prepared at the booth.

    All members of the news media will need badges to reach the Press Room, as well as Session Rooms in Moscone West and South, as well as the poster sessions and exhibition area in Moscone South. If you experience any difficulty at the Press/News Media registration booth, call the Press Room at +1-415-348-4440.

  8. News Media Registration Information

    News Media registrants receive a badge that provides access to any of the scientific sessions of the meeting, as well as to the Press Room and Briefing Room. Eligibility for press registration is limited to the following persons:
    • Working press employed by bona fide news media: must present a press card, business card, or letter of introduction from an editor of a recognized publication.
    • Freelance science writers: must present a current membership card from NASW, a regional affiliate of NASW, CSWA, ISWA, or SEJ; or evidence of by-lined work pertaining to science intended for the general public and published in 2006 or 2007; or a letter from the editor of a recognized publication assigning you to cover Fall Meeting.
    • Public information officers of scientific societies, educational institutions, and government agencies: must present a business card.

    Note 1: Representatives of publishing houses, for-profit corporations, and the business side of news media must register at the main registration desk at the meeting and pay the appropriate fees, regardless of possession of any of the above documents. They are not accredited as News Media at the meeting.

    Note 2: Scientists who are also reporters and who are presenting at this meeting (oral or poster session) may receive News Media credentials if they qualify (see above), but must also register for the meeting and pay the appropriate fee as a presenter.

  9. Who's Coming

    The online Who's Coming list and may be seen at: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/?content=media Now that online registration is closed, no further names will be added to this list.

-end-


American Geophysical Union

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