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Researcher Bruce McCandliss to address brain science and educational success in Seattle Dec. 6

December 02, 2016

WHAT

Dr. Bruce McCandliss, a renowned scholar on developmental cognitive neuroscience, will deliver a lecture titled "Early Education and the Brain: Making Novel Connections" as part of the American Educational Research Association's Centennial Lecture Series. The event is open to the public.

McCandliss, a professor and head of the Educational Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Stanford University, will discuss new insights into the connections between brain science and early educational success. Early elementary school is a time of remarkable transformations in cognitive skills that become the pillars of intellectual growth--including literacy and mathematical abilities. It is also a time of remarkable challenge for educational systems that struggle to serve the needs of learners in carrying out these transformations successfully. Developmental cognitive neuroscience provides a unique vantage point for understanding these transformations, by linking specific cognitive functions to brain circuitry in the mind of a young learner.

McCandliss' 20-to-30-minute long lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Linda Shaw, Education Editor at The Seattle Times. During the discussion, several experts will comment on McCandliss' talk and join him in fielding questions from the audience.

AERA's Centennial Lecture Series is a series of six education research lectures held across the country as part of the association's centennial celebration.

WHO

Bruce McCandliss is the head of the Educational Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Stanford University where he is a professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of Psychology (by courtesy). His research uses the tools of developmental cognitive neuroscience to study individual differences and educational transformations in key cognitive skills such as attention, literacy, and mathematics. He was a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) for his work in linking early literacy interventions to brain mechanisms. Read More.

WHEN

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, at 6 p.m. PST
Reception to follow

WHERE

Benaroya Hall
200 University St.
Seattle, WA

TO RSVP

To RSVP to attend the lecture visit http://www.aera100.net/bruce-mccandliss.html or email aera100@aera.net.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Visit http://www.aera100.net/cls.html.

Social Media

The hashtag for the AERA Centennial Lectures is is #AERALectures. You may also find us on Facebook and Twitter.
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About AERA

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Find AERA on Facebook and Twitter.

American Educational Research Association

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