Nav: Home

New gene therapy for pseudarthrosis trialed at Kazan University

December 02, 2016

A team headed by Professor Albert Rizvanov, director of the Gene and Cell Technologies Open Lab, created a gene therapy drug that encodes growth factors for the stimulation of blood vessel and bone formation. The combination was highly effective in a patient admitted to the Republican Clinical Hospital in Kazan, Russia. The treatment was approved by the ethical committee, supported by the Ministry of Healthcare of Tatarstan and published in BioNanoScience.

Professor Rizvanov explains: «We combined a demineralized bone transplant with recombinant genetic material, which carries genes for vascular endothelial growth factor, to stimulate new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis), and bone morphogenetic protein to stimulate bone growth (osteogenesis). Thus survival of transplant and bone tissue formation was achieved at the desired location. We were able to translate our basic and pre-clinical research and are the first to document the efficacy of such therapy in a real clinical case of pseudarthrosis».

As the team leader noted, for a long time clinicians have tried standard methods of bone regeneration - osteosynthesis and osteoplasty - when an absent bone part is replaced with allogenic, cadaveric or demineralized bone matrix. In the latter case cells and minerals are removed from an animal bone tissue, and only the matrix is left - a "bone-like sponge" that can be used to fill in defects in the bone to stimulate formation of a new bone. However, current procedures often result in complications, such as resorption of the transplant. Parts of the problem are poor blood supply and low levels of pro-osteogenic growth factors.

Our therapy, a combination of demineralized bone with gene therapy, is a promising solution for the currently existing complication problems in pseudarthrosis and other bone defects and fracture treatments. We now plan to offer such innovative treatments at the Kazan University Clinic as a part of a new clinical trial program at strategic academic unit Translational 7P Medicine for biomedical and translational research.
-end-


Kazan Federal University

Related Gene Therapy Articles:

Non-viral gene therapy to speed up cancer research
A new treatment method promises to speed up gene therapy research and could bring new, patient friendly cancer treatments to market faster.
Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the Leiden University Medical Center have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage.
Gene therapy for blood disorders
Delivering gene-regulating material to cells that live deep in our bone marrow and direct the formation of blood cells.
Realizing the potential of gene therapy for neurological disorders
Promising findings from preclinical animal studies show the potential of gene therapy for treating incurable neurological disorders.
Gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase gene do not increase the risk of cancer
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have shown in a new study that the gene therapy with telomerase that they have developed, and which has proven to be effective in mice against diseases caused by excessive telomere shortening and ageing, does not cause cancer or increase the risk of developing it, even in a cancer-prone setting.
More Gene Therapy News and Gene Therapy Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...