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Mount Sinai Health System researchers present influential research at ASH 2016

December 02, 2016

(San Diego, CA - December 1, 2016) - Physicians and researchers from Mount Sinai Health System are presenting influential research and study updates at the American Society of Hematology's Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego, CA, December 3-6, 2016.

Additionally, two Mount Sinai Health System researchers will be speakers at the ASH meeting and are available for interviews. Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, Professor of Oncological Sciences and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is a speaker at the Scientific Committee on Immunology and Host Defense on Saturday, December 3. Saghi Ghaffari, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is a speaker at the Scientific Committee on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine on Saturday, December 3, and Sunday, December 4.

Presentation highlights include:
  • Saturday, December 3, 5:30 pm PST--Ajai Chari, MD, Associate Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Clinical Research in the Multiple Myeloma Program, The Tisch Cancer Institute, will present Results of an Early Access Treatment Protocol (EAP) of Daratumumab in United States Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma and Use of Montelukast to Reduce Infusion Reactions in an Early Access Treatment Protocol of Daratumumab in United States Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

  • Sunday, December 4, 12:30 pm PST--Luena Papa, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Valproic Acid Expands the Numbers of HSCs from Cord Blood CD34+ Cells by Linking Epigenetic Modifications to Mitochondrial Remodeling and p53 Upregulation

  • Sunday, December 4, 5 pm PST--Joshua Brody, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Combining In Situ Vaccination with Immune Checkpoint Blockade Induces Long-term Regression of Lymphoma Tumors

  • Sunday, December 4, 5:30 pm PST--John O. Mascarenhas, MD, MS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Interim Analysis of the Myeloproliferative Disorders Research Consortium (MPD-RC) 112 Global Phase III Trial of Front Line Pegylated Interferon Alpha-2a Vs. Hydroxyurea in High Risk Polycythemia Vera and Essential Thrombocythemia

  • Sunday, December 4, 5:30 pm PST-- John E. Levine, MD, MS, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Co-director of Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium (MAGIC) and James L.M. Ferrara, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Oncological Sciences and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Co-director of MAGIC, will present An Early Biomarker Algorithm Predicts Lethal Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Survival after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

  • Sunday, December 4, 5:45 pm PST--Hannah Major-Monfried, BA, Medical Student, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, James L.M. Ferrara, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Oncological Sciences and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Co-director of MAGIC, and John E. Levine, MD, MS, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Co-director MAGIC, will present Biomarkers Predict Graft-Vs-Host Disease Outcomes Better Than Clinical Response after One Week of Treatment, which ASH selected as a highlight of the annual meeting

  • Sunday, December 4, 6 pm PST--Shyamala C. Navada, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Combination of Oral Rigosertib and Injectable Azacitidine in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS): Results from a Phase II Study

  • Sunday, December 4, 6 pm PST--Ajai Chari, MD, Associate Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Clinical Research in the Multiple Myeloma Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, will present Cardiac Events in Real-World Multiple Myeloma Patients Treated with Carfilzomib: A Retrospective Claims Database Analysis

  • Monday, December 5, 10:45 am PST--Ronald Hoffman, MD, Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Preclinical Development of a Cord Blood (CB)-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC) Product for Allogeneic Transplantation in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

  • Monday, December 5, 11:15 am PST--Deepak Perumal, PhD, Post-doctoral Scientist in Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present Network Modeling Reveals CDC42BPA and CLEC11A As Novel Driver Genes of t(4; 14) Multiple Myeloma

  • Monday, December 5, 6 pm PST--Ajai Chari, MD, Associate Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Clinical Research in the Multiple Myeloma Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, will present results on the Phase II Study of Pomalidomide, Daily Low Dose Oral Cyclophosphamide, and Dexamethasone in Relapsed /Refractory Multiple Myeloma

  • Monday, December 5, 6 pm PST--John D. Shaughnessy, Jr., PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will present results on Mutation Burden in Multiple Myeloma Is Captured by Gene Expression Profiles

-end-
About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals."

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

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