Forest inventories in California include more than trees

December 03, 2008

PORTLAND, Ore. December 3, 2008. The first 5-year forest inventory report for California's private and public lands is now available to the public: California's Forest Resources, 2001-2005: Five-Year Forest Inventory and Analysis Report.

Here are some key findings from the report:The data from the FIA reports are used by state, federal, and private land managers, investors, and others for a variety of purposes including the assessment of fuels and potential fire hazard, biomass and carbon storage, the effects of insects and disease, growth and mortality, wildlife habitat, plant diversity, and the supply of goods and services.

Since the 1930s, the U.S. Forest Service has conducted inventories of private lands throughout the United States. In the early days, inventories focused primarily on trees: how much timber was out there? Today's inventory is still about measuring and counting trees, but it also accounts for understory vegetation, down woody material, lichens, damage caused by insects and disease, and more.

Whereas the original inventory design produced resource bulletins about every 10 to 12 years from data collected over a 2- to 3-year period, today's inventory in the Western United States is conducted on a 10-year cycle where 1/10 of the field plots are measured annually on public and private forest land. Data are now posted each year and summary reports are issued every 5 years.

The frequency was directed by Congress through language in the 1998 Farm Bill, according to ecologist Joseph Donnegan, technical editor of the Oregon report and a member of the PNW Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program.

"Instead of the 10-year timber reports we used to produce, we now post data annually and write a report every 5 years that covers a much broader range of topics that regularly appear in the news. The idea was not only to provide data on an annual basis, but to be nationally consistent in how we conduct inventory and monitoring. Previously, different FIA regions were using different methodologies," explains Donnegan. "The results were specific for that region or part of the country, but comparisons and analyses weren't easily made owing to the variety of techniques used. The national Forest Inventory and Analysis Program now uses standard measurement and analysis techniques."

Standardization and the move to annual data availability occurred through the efforts of client input via blue-ribbon panels. Congress responded with Farm Bill directives and by allocating partial funding to begin progress toward a Forest Inventory and Analysis system that is national in scope.
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The California report was produced by the Pacific Northwest FIA Program which conducts forest inventories in Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, and the Pacific Islands.

There are four FIA Programs in the research branch of the U.S. Forest Service: the Pacific Northwest, Interior West, Northern, and Southern. The mission of each of the programs is to provide information on the status and trend in our Nation's forests to resource managers, scientists, conservationists, investors, and the public.

Contact: Joseph Donnegan, jdonnegan@fs.fed.us, (971) 678.8296

The technical editors of California's Forest Resources, 2001-2005: Five-Year Forest Inventory and Analysis Report are Glenn Christensen, Sally Campbell, and Jeremy Fried. Read it online at http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/publications/gtr763/.

For more information about the national Forest Inventory and Analysis Program visit http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/fia/.

The PNW Research Station is headquartered in Portland, Oregon. It has 11 laboratories and centers located in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington and about 500 employees.

USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Research Station

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