Nav: Home

BirdsEye -- a new iPhone app -- resolves your rapture for raptors or finding a finch

December 03, 2009

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Looking for larks? Searching for surfbirds? Checking for chickadees? There's an app for that.

BirdsEye, a new application for the iPhone and the iPod touch, is now available. Using content from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the Academy of Natural Sciences and bird expert Kenn Kaufman, this new application was developed by Birds in the Hand, LLC.

Learn where specific birds have been observed and obtain directions to the site. The new app offers a list of birds seen near your location and a map of birding hotspots for any point in North America - the contiguous 48 states, Canada, and Alaska. BirdsEye includes images and audio for 470 of the species that are most frequently observed in North America. Even for elusive birds, additional content is available -- for a total of 847 species. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Macaulay Library archive, the largest collection of bird and animal sounds in the world, provided bird sounds, while the VIREO collection at the Academy of Natural Sciences provided the images. Kaufman wrote text for each species.

BirdsEye accesses real-time observations that bird watchers submit online to eBird, a citizen-science project of the Cornell Lab and Audubon. Users of eBird file up to two million bird observation reports each month. The ability to submit observations to eBird directly from BirdsEye is already in the planning stage.
-end-
Portions of BirdsEye sales go back to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help support its research, education, and citizen science projects focused on birds, and to the Academy of Natural Sciences to support VIREO, the world's largest collection of bird photographs.

Web sites:

Cornell Lab of Ornithology:
www.birds.cornell.edu

eBird:
www.ebird.org

BirdsEye:
www.getbirdseye.com

Cornell University

Related Birds Articles:

How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind
How birds evolved big brains
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds.
Microelectronics for birds
Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Birds of a feather better not together
A new study of North American birds from Washington University in St.
Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness
Despite the perception that wild birds in farm fields can cause food-borne illness, a WSU study has found little evidence linking birds to E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks.
Birds are shrinking as the climate warms
After 40 years of collecting birds that ran into Chicago buildings, scientists have been able to show that the birds have been shrinking as the climate's warmed up.
Diving birds follow each other when fishing
Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.
Why do birds migrate at night?
Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night. 
How can robots land like birds?
Birds can perch on a wide variety of surfaces, thick or thin, rough or slick.
Is wildfire management 'for the birds?'
Spotted owl populations are in decline all along the West Coast, and as climate change increases the risk of large and destructive wildfires in the region, these iconic animals face the real threat of losing even more of their forest habitat.
More Birds News and Birds Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Wow-er
School's out, but many kids–and their parents–are still stuck at home. Let's keep learning together. Special guest Guy Raz joins Manoush for an hour packed with TED science lessons for everyone.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.