Public invited to 'An Evening of Science & Art' at ASCB Annual Meeting

December 03, 2012

For the first time in its history, the American Society for Cell Biology is inviting the general public to the opening session of the ASCB's Annual Meeting, for "An Evening of Art & Science" at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, on Saturday, Dec. 15.

Members of the public who sign up for free online at http://ascb.org/meetings/KeynoteRegistration.html will receive complimentary registration to the ASCB keynote addresses by Stephen Chu, Nobel prize laureate and U.S. Secretary of Energy, and Arthur Levinson, chair of Genentech, Inc. and Apple, Inc. After an introduction by ASCB President and 2012 Lasker awardee Ron Vale, both keynotes will address the strengthening feedback loop between basic research biology and new technologies driving medicine and the quantitative sciences.

The 6 pm keynote session will be preceded by the 5 pm opening of "ASCB2," a virtuoso art exhibit featuring 36 pieces curated by scientist-artists Graham Johnson and Janet Iwasa that explore the revolution in scientific visualization created by the melding of basic biology, mathematic modeling and Hollywood special effects. Both Johnson and Iwasa are pioneers in new techniques of scientific illustration and animation.

Secretary Chu will describe how the "hard" sciences of physics, math, informatics, and engineering are rewiring cell biology. Levinson, whose top positions at both Genentech, Inc. and Apple, Inc. give him a unique perspective, will explore the new scientific culture behind advances in cancer therapeutics.

Iwasa, a lecturer in molecular visualization at Harvard Medical School, received the PhD degree from UCSF and a certification in animation from the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood, CA. Johnson, a trained medical illustrator, recently received the PhD at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, and is currently a QB3 (California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences) UCSF Faculty Fellow.

In addition to work by Johnson and Iwasa, the art exhibit will include David Goodsell's 8′-long illustration of an E. coli bacterium in exquisite molecular detail.
-end-
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: John Fleischman
American Society for Cell Biology
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212

Cathy Yarbrough
Cyarbrough@ascb.org
858-243-1814

American Society for Cell Biology

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