INRS: Professor Federico Rosei elected AAAS Fellow in recognition of his meritorious efforts to advance science

December 03, 2012

Quebec City, December 3, 2012 - In recognition of his meritorious efforts to advance science, Professor Federico Rosei, Director of the INRS Energy Materials Telecommunications Research Centre, was elected as a Fellow by his peers in the Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In particular, his outstanding contribution to the understanding of the physical and chemical properties of surfaces and interfaces was recognized. Dr. Rosei will receive this prestigious honour at the induction ceremony for new Fellows on February 16, 2013, in Boston at the AAAS Annual Meeting.

Remarkably, Dr. Rosei is the only Canadian honoured by the AAAS in the physics section, which accounts for 49 of a total of 702 candidates elected to 24 sections for 2012.

"I am very pleased about Professor Federico Rosei's election as an AAAS Fellow. This is a testament to the high level of scientific credibility he enjoys among his peers. This prestigious international recognition also reflects Dr. Rosei's important contribution to the advancement of knowledge and innovation in the field of advanced materials and nanotechnology--a priority research field at our university," said INRS director general Daniel Coderre.

Holder of the Canada Research Chair in Nanostructured Organic and Inorganic Material, Professor Rosei is an international calibre researcher who is known for his innovative work that has spawned technological spinoffs in the nanoscience field. His remarkable scientific contributions have already earned him the 2011 Rutherford Memorial Medal for Chemistry from the Royal Society of Canada, the 2010 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, as well an appointment as a Fellow at the United Kingdom's Institute of Physics, Royal Society of Chemistry, Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, Institution of Engineering and Technology, and Institute of Nanotechnology. Professor Rosei is also a Senior member of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and a member of the Sigma Xi society.

Our heartfelt congratulations to the new AAAS Fellow!
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About the AAAS

Founded in 1848, AAAS is an international non-profit organization dedicated to advancing science and serving society through initiatives in science policy, international programs, and science education. Open to all, this organization publishes the journal Science, which has more than one million readers.

About INRS

Institut national de recherche scientifique (INRS) is a graduate and postgraduate research and training university. First in Canada in terms of research intensity (grants per professor), INRS brings together some 150 professors and close to 700 students and postdoctoral fellows in its centres in Montreal, Quebec City, Laval, and Varennes. INRS research teams conduct fundamental research essential to the advancement of science in Quebec as well as internationally and play a critical role in developing concrete solutions to problems facing our society.

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

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