KAIST developed the biotemplated design of piezoelectric energy harvesting device

December 03, 2013

A research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee and Professor Yoon Sung Nam from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at KAIST has developed the biotemplated design of flexible piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called "nanogenerator."

Nature has its own capabilities to spontaneously synthesize and self-assemble universal materials with sophisticated architectures such as shells, sea sponges, and bone minerals. For instance, the natural sea shell, consisting of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), is very rigid and tough whereas the artificial chalk made by the same material is fragile. In addition, most of artificial syntheses are performed under toxic, expensive and extreme environments in contrast to the natural syntheses, which are processed in benign and mild surroundings. If human can mimic these biological abilities, a variety of ecological and material issues can be solved.

The KAIST team modified a M13 viral gene, which is harmless to human and widely exist in nature, to utilize its remarkable ability of synthesizing a highly piezoelectric inorganic material, barium titanate (BaTiO3). By using this biotemplated piezoelectric material, a high-output flexible nanogenerator could be fabricated with an enhanced performance. The flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator that converts mechanical energy of tiny movements into electrical energy is an attractive candidate for the next generation energy harvesting technology. This biotemplated nanogenerator will drive commercial LCD screens and LED bulbs by simple finger movements.

Professor Lee said, "This is the first time to introduce a biotemplated inorganic piezoelectric material to a self-powered energy harvesting system, which can be realized through eco-friendly and efficient material syntheses."
-end-
The research result was published in the November online issue of the American Chemical Society's journal, ACS Nano (Virus-Directed Design of a Flexible BaTiO3 Nanogenerator). In addition, the team also extended their research to a large-area and mass producible "PZT based nanocomposite generator," which was published in the December issue of Advanced Energy Materials, a Wiley-VCH journal.

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Related Nanogenerator Articles from Brightsurf:

Calcium bursts kill drug-resistant tumor cells
Multidrug resistance (MDR) -- a process in which tumors become resistant to multiple medicines -- is the main cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy.

This tiny device can scavenge wind energy from the breeze you make when you walk
Most of the wind available on land is too gentle to push commercial wind turbine blades, but now researchers in China have designed a kind of 'tiny wind turbine' that can scavenge wind energy from breezes as little as those created by a brisk walk.

Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide
An RMIT-UNSW collaboration applies liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements.

Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment
Scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind.

Researchers pioneer new production method for heterostructure devices
Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed a pioneering production method for heterostructure devices, based on 2D materials such as graphene.

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries
Researchers from the University of Surrey have revealed their new biodegradable motion sensor -- paving the way for implanted nanotechnology that could help future sports professionals better monitor their movements to aid rapid improvements, or help caregivers remotely monitor people living with dementia.

Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity
Scientists have developed an energy harvesting device that generates over 5 volts of electricity from a liquid droplet.

Static electricity as strong as lightening can be saved in a battery
Prof. Dong Sung Kim and his joint research team presented a new technology that can increase the amount of power generated by a triboelectric nanogenerator.

2D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states
A new class of 2D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics.

Novel Chinese nanogenerator takes cue from electric eels
Researchers from the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a bionic stretchable nanogenerator (BSNG) that takes inspiration from electric eels.

Read More: Nanogenerator News and Nanogenerator Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.