Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation

December 03, 2020

Despite early referral and education, half of patients with advanced CKD delay AVF creation.

Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education. Delay is often related to patient choice but research on patients' perspectives is limited and no measure of attitudes towards hemodialysis preparation presently exists. In this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, researchers surveyed pre-dialysis patients and their family members about their perceptions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their intentions to undergo access creation. They also report on a new survey instrument to measure attitudes towards hemodialysis preparation. Domains covered in the instrument included perceptions about the value of vascular access as well as concerns including about the need for dialysis and costs. Beliefs about value of vascular access predicted patients' intentions to prepare for hemodialysis as well as their access outcomes.
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AMERICAN JOURNAL OF KIDNEY DISEASES

ARTICLE TITLE: Psychosocial Factors, Intentions to Pursue Arteriovenous Dialysis Access, and Access Outcomes: A Cohort Study

AUTHORS: Jace Ming Xuan Chia, B.Soc.Sci, Zhong Sheng Goh, B.Soc.Sci, Pei Shing Seow, B.Soc.Sci, Terina Ying-Ying Seow, MRCP, Jason Chon Jun Choo, MRCP, Marjorie Foo, FRCP, Stanton Newman, Ph.D, and Konstadina Griva, Ph.D

DOI: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2020.09.019

Full text of article available by email from media contact.

National Kidney Foundation

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