New Haydale HDPlas™ inks launched at Printed Electronics 2012

December 04, 2012

Santa Clara 4th December 2012 -- Haydale, the world's leading supplier of high quality plasma functionalised, highly dispersible graphenes, announces the immediate availability of its new range of graphene based inks for printed electronics. The new range of functional components based on graphenes, are designed for applications in gas/chemical and bio- sensors, thin film lithium ion batteries and conductive inks.

Technical Manager Martin Williams explained "We are confident that Haydale's split plasma processed graphenes will deliver significant benefits over current commercial sensor technology. While current chemical field effect transistors have excellent sensitivity and selectivity they are unavailable on a mass-market basis due to high manufacturing costs. HDPlas™ inks enable a wide range of low cost devices based on changes in the conductivity of graphenes."

Haydale plasma decorated silicon-graphene nano platelets are available in a range of surface areas, and with x-y dimensions of less than 2 microns provide an ideal current collecting component for thin film lithium ion batteries. Dispensing with the need to use expensive metallic components allows HDPlas™ inks to provide the cost effective current collector required by the market.

Haydale's HDPlas™ plasma processed material is available in a variety of formats that are compatible with current printing technologies, and can be modified to meet specific customer requirements.

Commercial Director, Ray Gibbs added "Haydale's graphene based inks, launched under our brand HDPlas™ have the potential to enable a wide range of new printed applications including smart cards, medical devices, greeting cards, high security credit card sensors and passive RFID. In response to increased demand we are currently commissioning a five fold increase in production capacity, along with an expanded product development laboratory."

Haydale's HDPlas™ inks and other products will be available on the Cheap Tubes inc. stand D03 at the Printed Electronics 2012 conference and tradeshow at Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great America Parkway, Santa Clara, CA from 5-6 December 2012.
-end-
Contacts for Further Information:

Ray Gibbs (Haydale Commercial Director) Tel +44 (0)7836 776128

Trevor Phillips (Media Relations Officer) Tel +44 (0)7889 153628

www.haydale.com

www.hdplas.com

About Haydale

Haydale Ltd, part of the Innovative Carbon Group, is established as a leading specialist carbon nanomaterials provider, serving the global composites, electronics, photovoltaics, sensor and materials community.

The patented split plasma is a versatile and industrially scalable process, designed to promote homogeneous compatibility of nanomaterial fillers for a wide range of engineering and commercial applications, supplied under the HDPlas™ brand.

Haydale works closely with its partners to develop materials solutions closely tailored to customer needs. Clients range from academic institutions to some of the worlds leading companies, from chemicals to fashion and from microelectronics to food packaging.

Haydale's unique and patented split plasma process is combined with a full suite of analytical instrumentation giving the capability to develop and produce custom carbon nanomaterials for a wide variety of applications.

Hermes Financial Public Relations

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