How race is associated with differences among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

December 04, 2019

What The Study Did: Researchers in this observational study looked at how race was associated with difference in symptoms, access to care, genetic testing and clinical outcomes among 2,467 patients (8.3% black and 91.7% white) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition where the heart muscle becomes abnormally thick, which can make it harder to pump blood.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Neal K. Lakdawala, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2019.4638)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamacardio.2019.4638?guestAccessKey=ce302e44-673e-405b-9f99-ccbdcaedfd3e&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=120419

JAMA Cardiology

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