Nav: Home

New study provides insight into chronic kidney disease

December 04, 2019

(Boston) - Researchers have further analyzed a known signaling pathway they believe brings them one step closer to understanding the complex physiology of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which might provide a path to new treatment options.

CKD is a complex and unique condition that involves impaired removal of many different toxins from the blood. These toxins, which often are referred to as uremic solutes, then can cause damage to multiple different organ systems, not limited to the kidneys. Patients with CKD are at a heightened risk for complications to the heart and brain, which increases morbidity and mortality.

To understand how uremic solutes causes damage in the kidney and other organs, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) tested a pathway called Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). In previous studies, these same researchers showed that molecules that activate AHR have a toxic effect on blood vessels.

The researchers created an experimental model where they monitored blood levels of different uremic solutes and the levels of AHR in different organ systems. They discovered that, as the levels of uremic solutes increased in the blood, so did the levels of AHR, suggesting that AHR may be responsible for the damage to blood vessels that is seen in CKD, at least in part. The researchers noted that AHR also increased in the heart, liver and brain. This is the first study that has been able to directly demonstrate the activation of AHR in different organs and within specific tissues of that organ.

The researchers believe that these uremic solutes (called indoxyl sulfate and kyurenine), could potentially be translated into clinical blood tests that may give a more complete picture about the severity and progression of a patient's kidney disease. Moreover, AHR may be a target for new medication development in the treatment of CKD. "From a clinical standpoint," explained corresponding author, Vipul Chitalia, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at BUSM, "it further adds evidence to the use of AHR inhibitors as effective therapeutics to combat complications associated with CKD and uremic solutes."

These findings appear online in the in journal Kidney International.
-end-
Funding for this study was provided by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research at the Boston University School of Medicine.

Boston University School of Medicine

Related Kidney Disease Articles:

Genes tell a story about diabetic kidney disease
Studying Finnish genes leads to unique revelations about the development of a serious complication of diabetes, and informs an ongoing genomic study of a Singaporean cohort as part of Singapore's Diabetes Study in Nephropathy and other Microvascular Complications (DYNAMO).
New study provides insight into chronic kidney disease
Researchers have further analyzed a known signaling pathway they believe brings them one step closer to understanding the complex physiology of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which might provide a path to new treatment options.
Predicting risk of chronic kidney disease
Data from about 5 million people (with and without diabetes) in 28 countries were used to develop equations to help identify people at increased five-year risk of chronic kidney disease, defined as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).
A healthy diet may help prevent kidney disease
In an analysis of published studies, a healthy dietary pattern was associated with a 30% lower incidence of chronic kidney disease.
Is kidney failure a man's disease?
A new analysis of the ERA-EDTA Registry [1] reveals a striking gender difference in the incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease.
Chronic kidney disease: Everyone's concern
850 million people worldwide are affected by kidney disease. This worrying figure was published last June.
Revealed: 35 kidney genes linked to chronic kidney disease risk
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease.
Gene editing possible for kidney disease
For the first time scientists have identified how to halt kidney disease in a life-limiting genetic condition, which may pave the way for personalised treatment in the future.
In kidney disease patients, illicit drug use linked with disease progression and death
Among individuals with chronic kidney disease, hard illicit drug use was associated with higher risks of kidney disease progression and early death.
Drinking more water does not slow decline of kidney function for kidney disease patients
A new study, published in JAMA by researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, found that coaching patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) to drink more water does not slow down the decline of their kidney function.
More Kidney Disease News and Kidney Disease Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.