Closest-ever approach to the sun gives new insights into the solar wind

December 04, 2019

The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the Sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind.

NASA's Parker Solar Probe was launched in August 2018. Its first results are published today in a series of four papers in Nature, with Imperial College London scientists among those interpreting some of the key data to reveal how the solar wind is accelerated away from the surface of the Sun.

The solar wind is a stream of charged particles released by the Sun that fills our Solar System. It is responsible for the North and Southern lights, but can also cause disruption during violent episodes like solar flares and coronal mass ejections, knocking out power grids and satellites.

Now, an international team have shown that bursty 'spikes' of solar wind originate in holes in the Sun's outer atmosphere near its equator, and are accelerated by magnetic phenomena as they flow away into deep space and past the Earth.

The new research suggests that the spikes are generated by 'magnetic reconnection' near the Sun, a process that pulls on the tense lines of the Sun's magnetic field creates folds or 'switchbacks'. These events last only a couple of minutes but release lots of energy, accelerating the solar wind away in long tubes that are approximately the diameter of the Earth.

The finding builds on data from the HELIOS missions, launched in the 1970s, the previous record-holders for the closest approach to the Sun.

Professor Tim Horbury from Imperial's Department of Physics is a co-investigator on Parker Solar Probe's FIELDS instrument, which is led by the University of California, Berkeley. He said: "From HELIOS data we could see what might be 'spikes' of faster solar wind, and now we have been able to confirm their existence in striking detail with Parker Solar Probe.

"We usually think of the fast solar wind as very smooth, but Parker Solar Probe saw surprisingly slow wind with a large number of these little bursts and jets of plasma, creating long tubes of fast wind containing plasma with around twice the energy of the background solar wind."

Parker Solar Probe is studying the Sun's outer atmosphere, called the corona, directly flying through it to better understand the origins of the solar wind.

For the new study, Parker Solar Probe took data at a distance of 24 million kilometres from the Sun, inside the orbit of Mercury. It will fly successively closer to the Sun in the coming years, eventually reaching a distance of less than six million kilometres from its surface and far closer than the Earth's average distance of 150 million kilometres.

Scientists know the properties of the solar wind change as it travels from the Sun to the Earth, so studying the solar wind closer to its origin should reveal more about how it is created and evolves.

Parker Solar Probe will also be joined next year by Solar Orbiter, a European Space Agency mission with Imperial kit onboard.

Professor Horbury added: "Although Parker Solar Probe will get even more accurate measurements of the young solar wind at its closest approach, it's too close for telescopes, so it won't be able to see what features on the surface of the Sun may be creating the structures of the solar wind.

"This is where Solar Orbiter comes in. It will not go as close to the Sun, but will have sophisticated telescopes and instruments on board that will be able to see from a distance what might be causing phenomena Parker Solar probe is detecting up close, forming a fuller picture of what creates and accelerates the solar wind."

Other results from the first data include measurement of the speed the solar wind, which does not flow radially away from the Sun, but has a sideways speed of 15-25 times faster than predicted; and a 'snowplow' effect where charged particles bunch up before being accelerated by a coronal mass ejection event.
-end-


Imperial College London

Related Solar Wind Articles from Brightsurf:

Wind beneath their wings: Albatrosses fine-tuned to wind conditions
A new study of albatrosses has found that wind plays a bigger role in their decision to take flight than previously thought, and due to their differences in body size, males and females differ in their response to wind.

New research deepens understanding of Earth's interaction with the solar wind
A team of scientists at PPPL and Princeton University has reproduced a process that occurs in space to deepen understanding of what happens when the Earth encounters the solar wind.

Hydropower plants to support solar and wind energy in West Africa
Study maps smart electricity mix composed of solar, wind and hydropower for West Africa -- regional cooperation can provide up to 60% reliable and clean electricity

Solar and wind energy sites mapped globally for the first time
Researchers at the University of Southampton have mapped the global locations of major renewable energy sites, providing a valuable resource to help assess their potential environmental impact.

New research helps explain why the solar wind is hotter than expected
When the sun expels plasma, the solar wind cools as it expands through space -- but not as much as the laws of physics would predict.

Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar 'wind,' a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun.

Supporting structures of wind turbines contribute to wind farm blockage effect
Much about the aerodynamic effects of larger wind farms remains poorly understood.

Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes
New data from the Parker Solar Probe, which got closer to the sun than any other spacecraft, allowed physicists to map the source of a major component of the solar wind that continually peppers Earth.

Closest-ever approach to the sun gives new insights into the solar wind
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind.

SwRI-built instrument confirms solar wind slows farther away from the Sun
Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored.

Read More: Solar Wind News and Solar Wind Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.