Cedars-Sinai medical tipsheet for December 2005

December 05, 2005

FROM CANDLES TO CANDY, ORNAMENTS TO ALLERGIES, THE HOLIDAYS SERVE UP SPECIAL RISKS FOR KIDS - 14 TIPS FOR PROTECTING KIDS FROM HOLIDAY HAZARDS
According to experts, the highest incidence of household injuries occur at party times and during times of increased family activity. Regardless of the holiday you're celebrating, it's in your children's best interest for you to be aware of risks and more importantly, of how to prevent accidents.

STUDIES SHOW APO A-I MILANO GENE TRANSFER AND ANTIBODY THERAPY CUT ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUE
Cardiology researchers at Cedars-Sinai are studying several approaches to interrupt the events leading to the formation and rupture of atherosclerotic plaque in blood vessels. According to a recent animal study of a new gene therapy, a single injection led to a significant reduction in plaque and moderation of an immune response that contributes to plaque buildup and rupture. Another study found that the administration of certain antibodies significantly reduced pre-existing plaque deposits.

MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY MAY INCREASE OPTIONS FOR OCTOGENARIANS WITH SOME LUNG CANCERS
While some patients, including the elderly, may not be good candidates for the physical demands of open chest surgery, a new study suggests that even those between the ages of 80 and 94 may benefit from video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for early stage, localized, non-small cell lung cancer.

IBS STUDY SHOWS THAT TARGETED ANTIBIOTICS LEAD TO LONG-LASTING IMPROVEMENT IN SYMPTOMS
Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found that a nonabsorbable antibiotic - one that stays in the gut - may be an effective long-term treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The findings, which showed that participants benefited from the antibiotic use even after the course of treatment ended, support previously published research identifying small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) as a possible cause of the disease.

STUDY CONFIRMS THAT STENTS RELEASING MEDICATION HELP KEEP HEART BYPASS VEIN GRAFTS OPEN
During an angioplasty procedure, a stent may be placed in the vessel to keep it open, but conventional metal stents often become overgrown with scar tissue. Now a study confirms that medication-releasing stents reduce scar tissue formation in saphenous vein grafts, and patients receiving them have lower short-term incidence of vessel re-narrowing, heart attack and death.

SHORTNESS OF BREATH WITHOUT CHEST PAIN CAN SIGNIFY THE PRESENCE OF HIGH RISK HEART DISEASE
Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found that patients with shortness of breath can have a higher risk of dying from cardiac disease than patients without symptoms, and even than patients with typical cardiac pain. Authors of a study published in the November 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine reported that shortness of breath was a significant predictor of death from cardiac causes, as well as death from any cause.

NEW RESIDENCY TRAINING PROGRAM AT CEDARS-SINAI TO TRAIN A DIFFERENT BREED OF NEUROSURGEON
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Division of Neurosurgery has established a new neurosurgical training program that is designed to produce neurosurgeons who are as skilled in the research laboratory as they are in the operating room.

CEDARS-SINAI PARTNERS WITH THE VETERANS AFFAIRS GREATER LOS ANGELES HEALTHCARE SYSTEM TO EXPAND ITS INTERNAL MEDICINE TRAINING PROGRAM
As residency programs face increasing challenges to provide quality education in the midst of a rapidly changing healthcare environment, Cedars-Sinai is now partnering with the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VA) to expand its internal medicine residency program.

TWO CEDARS-SINAI PHYSICIAN GROUPS NAMED IN RANKINGS OF CALIFORNIA'S BEST FOR PATIENT SATISFACTION, PREVENTIVE CARE AND USE OF TECHNOLOGY
Cedars-Sinai Health System's two physician groups that provide primary care and multi-specialty care - Cedars-Sinai Health Associates and Cedars-Sinai Medical Group - each ranked among the top five medical groups in Los Angeles for clinical quality, patient satisfaction and use of information technology, an independent review organization has announced.

STUDIES EXPLORE THE RISK OF CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PREGNANCIES CONCEIVED WITH ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES
Most infertility cases are treated with conventional medical therapies such as medication or surgery. Others are treated with special procedures, known as assisted reproductive technologies or ART, that involve handling both the woman's eggs and the man's sperm outside of one's body. Two studies recently completed at Cedars-Sinai focused on the risks of chromosomal abnormalities in pregnancies conceived by infertile couples who underwent ART.

INFERTILITY RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY ONE GENE'S CRITICAL ROLE IN THE HUMAN EMBRYO IMPLANTATION PROCESS
Why some embryos successfully attach to the endometrium and others do not continues to be a mystery as little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the implantation process. Now, researchers at Cedars-Sinai have investigated one gene's critical role in this process, thereby bringing them a step closer to finding methods to help the more than 6.1 million women in the United States who suffer from infertility.

LEADING RESEARCHERS FROM ISRAEL AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRESENT STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM
Experts in stem cell research and technology from Israel and Southern California recently presented a symposium on advances in stem cell biology and therapeutics. Several top researchers from Israel joined scientists and bioethicists to present a stem cell symposium at Cedars-Sinai.
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To pursue any of these story ideas, please contact Sandy Van via e-mail (sandy@prpacific.com) or by calling 800-880-2397.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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