Latest Integrated Microbial Genomes data management system update release

December 05, 2007

WALNUT CREEK, CA--Version 2.4 of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) data management system, a resource provided to the scientific community for microbial genome data analysis, has now been released. Hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), IMG has built a popular following as reflected in the overwhelming response to IMG workshops offered in Spring 2008, now full. DOE JGI has added a fall session, September 15-19, 2008. Registration is now open at http://www.jgi.doe.gov/meetings/mgm/.

IMG 2.4's content has been updated with new microbial genomes from the Version 25 release of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq). IMG 2.4 also contains a total of 3,637 genomes consisting of 818 bacterial, 50 archaeal, and 40 eukaryotic genomes; 2,042 viruses and bacterial phages; and 687 plasmids. Among these genomes, there are 3,334 finished and 303 draft genomes, of which 256 (185 finished and 71 draft) are genomes sequenced by DOE JGI.

The IMG native controlled vocabulary of functional terms and pathways has been extended to 4,148 terms and 524 pathways, with 546,169 genes characterized using IMG terms. Functional annotation of genomes in IMG has been further enhanced through the computation of fused genes and by filling in various RNA genes missing from the original genome data sets.

IMG's user interface has been reorganized and enhanced to improve ease of use. IMG's user manual, UsingIMG, has been revised and extended. For more details, see What's New (and Using IMG at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/.
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IMG is a collaborative effort between DOE JGI and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Biological Data Management and Technology Center (BDMTC). IMG is updated on a quarterly basis with new public and DOE JGI genomes. The next IMG update is scheduled for March, 2008.

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, supported by the DOE Office of Science, unites the expertise of five national laboratories -- Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest -- along with the Stanford Human Genome Center to advance genomics in support of the DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization and cleanup. DOE JGI's Walnut Creek, CA, Production Genomics Facility provides integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis that enable systems-based scientific approaches to these challenges.

DOE/Joint Genome Institute

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