American Society of Clinical Oncology issues annual report on progress against cancer

December 05, 2011

ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today released Clinical Cancer Advances 2011: ASCO's Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer, an independent review of the advances in cancer research that have had the greatest impact on patient care this year. The report also identifies the most promising trends in oncology and provides insights from experts on where the future of cancer care is heading.

"We've made significant strides in clinical cancer research over the past year and this report adds renewed hope for patients," said Nicholas J. Vogelzang, MD, Co-Executive Editor of the report. "More personalized treatment approaches and advances in early detection are helping patients live longer, healthier lives. But we must improve the nation's clinical research system and expand access to quality cancer care to accelerate the pace of progress."

This year's top research advances demonstrate new therapies for reducing cancer recurrence, progress made against hard-to-treat cancers, and improvements in cancer prevention and screening. The report also highlights several new drug approvals that bring smarter, more effective therapies to specific genetic subgroups of patients with cancer. The top five advances selected by the editors are: Selected by an 18-person editorial board of prominent oncologists, the report highlights a total of 54 advances in clinical oncology over the past year and covers the full scope of patient care, including cancer disparities, advanced cancer care and survivor care. Clinical Cancer Advances 2011 also features a "Year in Review" section, which describes key cancer policy developments and ASCO policy initiatives from the past year that are likely to influence cancer care over the coming years. Some of the important topics covered in this section include:
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To request a full copy of the Clinical Cancer Advances 2011 report, please contact Susie Tappouni at susie.tappouni@asco.org

About the Report

Clinical Cancer Advances was developed under the guidance of an 18-person editorial board made up of leading oncologists, including specialty editors for each of the disease- and issue-specific sections. Editors reviewed studies in peer-reviewed scientific journals and the results of research presented at major scientific meetings from October 2010 through September 2011. Only studies that significantly altered the way a cancer is understood or had an important impact on patient care were selected for the report. The report and additional resources will be posted on ASCO's patient Website at www.cancer.net/cca and will be published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on December 5.

About ASCO

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is the world's leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people with cancer. With more than 30,000 members, ASCO is committed to improving cancer care through scientific meetings, educational programs and peer-reviewed journals. ASCO is supported by its affiliate organization, the Conquer Cancer Foundation, which funds ground-breaking research and programs that make a tangible difference in the lives of people with cancer. For ASCO information and resources, visit www.asco.org/presscenter. Patient-oriented cancer information is available at www.cancer.net

American Society of Clinical Oncology

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