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Charles B. Nemeroff given the ACNP Julius Axelrod Mentorship Award

December 05, 2016

The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) has named Charles B. Nemeroff, M.D., Ph.D. as one of two winners of the 2016 Julius Axelrod Mentorship Award. Dr. Nemeroff is the Leonard M. Miller Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Clinical Director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida. The Axelrod Mentorship Award, being presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the ACNP in Hollywood, Florida, is presented to an ACNP member who has made an outstanding contribution to neuropsychopharmacology by mentoring and developing young scientists into leaders in the field.

Dr. Nemeroff is internationally known for his research into the biological underpinnings of neuropsychiatric disorders and their treatment and has been an active mentor for more than three decades. His mentees have ranged from undergraduate students to post graduate trainees and residents. Many of his former mentees have continued to seek his guidance and advice well into their own successful careers, some even into their own positions as psychiatry department chairs. He has realized that type of success in mentoring that results in former students and mentees developing into colleagues and peers. Many of his former mentees are now professors of psychiatry, leaders of research departments in pharmaceutical companies, and some are now psychiatry department chairs. In addition, Dr. Nemeroff, for over 10 years, organized and funded through unrestricted educational grants the annual Emory Residents Symposium and the Future Leaders Symposium in which every psychiatry department in the nation was able to send a junior faculty member or a resident to hear presentations from leaders in the field. He has established the Career Development Leadership Program for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and serves as the chair of the American Psychiatric Association Research Colloquium.
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ACNP, founded in 1961, is a professional organization of more than 1000 leading scientists, including four Nobel Laureates. The mission of ACNP is to further research and education in neuropsychopharmacology and related fields in the following ways: promoting the interaction of a broad range of scientific disciplines of brain and behavior in order to advance the understanding of prevention and treatment of disease of the nervous system including psychiatric, neurological, behavioral and addictive disorders; encouraging scientists to enter research careers in fields related to these disorders and their treatment; and ensuring the dissemination of relevant scientific advances.

American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

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