Nav: Home

David Glahn given the ACNP Joel Elkes Research Award

December 05, 2016

The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) has named David Glahn, Ph.D., Professor of psychiatry and Co-Director of the Division on Neurocognition, Neurocomputation and Neurogenetics at Yale University School of Medicine as the winner of the Joel Elkes Research Award. This award, presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the ACNP in Hollywood, Florida, is in recognition of an outstanding clinical contribution to neuropsychopharmacology. In nominating Dr. Glahn for the award, Dr. John Krystal, Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Yale, called him a "strikingly original and productive scientist", a "dynamic teacher", and "an outstanding mentor".

Dr. Glahn has published over 200 papers and reviews in leading scientific journals, leads a number of research grants funded by the National Institutes of Health, and has played a seminal role in building and leading imaging-genomics consortia to advance the analytic methods for the enormous datasets involved in whole genome sequencing. The power of Dr. Glahn's approach is that he uses function to search for structure. That is, he utilizes his deep knowledge of cognitive neuroscience to nominate potential biomarkers, which can then be studied in large pedigree cohorts to assess heritability, reveal disease associations, and identify putative risk genes. This approach helps to ensure that identified risk genes are likely to have a meaningful impact on the daily functioning of the individual, eliminating the need to conduct a post-hoc search to ascribe function. In addition, Dr. Glahn served as a Section Editor for Human Brain Mapping and currently serves on the editorial board of three other professional journals. He is a Fellow in the ACNP, and has been the recipient of a number of other professional honors, including the A. E. Bennett Award of the Society of Biological Psychiatry.
-end-
Media contact: Erin Colladay at ecolladay@acnp.org; 615-649-3074

ACNP, founded in 1961, is a professional organization of more than 1000 leading scientists, including four Nobel Laureates. The mission of ACNP is to further research and education in neuropsychopharmacology and related fields in the following ways: promoting the interaction of a broad range of scientific disciplines of brain and behavior in order to advance the understanding of prevention and treatment of disease of the nervous system including psychiatric, neurological, behavioral and addictive disorders; encouraging scientists to enter research careers in fields related to these disorders and their treatment; and ensuring the dissemination of relevant scientific advances.

American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Related Medicine Articles:

A new discovery in regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Monash University and Duke-NUS researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility.
Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017.
Nuclear medicine and COVID-19: New content from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
In one of five new COVID-19-related articles and commentaries published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Johnese Spisso discusses how the UCLA Hospital System has dealt with the pandemic.
Moving beyond 'defensive medicine'
Study shows removing liability concerns slightly increases C-section procedures during childbirth.
NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.
Protein injections in medicine
One day, medical compounds could be introduced into cells with the help of bacterial toxins.
Study reveals complementary medicine use remains hidden to conventional medicine providers
Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.
Study of traditional medicine finds high use in Sub-Saharan Africa despite modern medicine
Researchers who have undertaken the first systematic review of into the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM) in Sub-Saharan Africa found its use is significant and not just because of a lack of resources or access to 'conventional medicine'.
New techniques allow medicine to see the whole again
Medical diagnoses mostly focuses on resolving isolated issues. But, fixing one problem may create others and even invoke an overall health collapse.
More Medicine News and Medicine Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer
With the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there's been a lot of debate about how much power the Supreme Court should really have. We think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful beings, issuing momentous rulings from on high. But they haven't always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, started it all.  Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.